Simploring 2018 (80) The Girl Who Cried Wolf by Cica Ghost

I got an invite from Cica Ghost to visit her newest installation, called “The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, that opened September 13th. In the landmark description Cica explains the title of her work “Modification of Aesop’s fable The Boy Who Cried Wolf“. I admit that I’m not very familiar with fables and I never heard about this one, hence I looked it up at wikipedia:

The “Boy Who Cried Wolf” is one of Aesop’s Fables. Aesop’s Fables, or the Aesopica, is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 564 BCE. Of diverse origins, the stories associated with his name have descended to modern times through a number of sources and continue to be reinterpreted in different verbal registers and in popular as well as artistic media.
The tale concerns a shepherd boy who repeatedly tricks nearby villagers into thinking wolves are attacking his flock. When a wolf actually does appear and the boy again calls for help, the villagers believe that it is another false alarm and the sheep are eaten by the wolf. In later English-language poetic versions of the fable, the wolf also eats the boy. The moral stated at the end of the Greek version is, “this shows how liars are rewarded: even if they tell the truth, no one believes them”. (exerpt from wikipedia)

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (1)

Before I visited “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” on Friday, September 14th, I read Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica’s The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, that was published on September 13th. Inara talked with Cica about her newest installation and Cica explained her ideas and thoughts behind it. I recommend reading Inara’s post before visiting.

My visit was short but very enjoyable. The installation is set on a rocky but not meagre island. When you walk from the landing point to the center of the island you first see the wolf hunting the sheep. A flock of birds is flying above the scene. The sheeps and the wolf are running that fast that they hoover above the ground. The only sheep that is safe from the wolf is significantly a black sheep on the top of one rock. Not far from this scene you find the girl who cried wolf. She looks scared and points to the sheep looking at a boy sitting on a rock and playing a flute. As opposed to the girl, he seems not to be impressed, nor willing to interfer. Just behind him is a little house with a garden, the village from the fable.

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (2)

Cica has developed her very own style and the girl and the boy look very “Cica-ish”. I wouldn’t have recognized the sheep and the wolf as her work at the first glance though. The flowers, that are spread over the sim, are those Cica already used in her installation Bees and Bears (read here) And you will find again one of Cica’s 50 cats (read here), it sits on the roof of the house. Like in many of her installations before humans are really short compared to everything else. This way you experience an other point of view, maybe more respectfully.

As Inara mentioned in her blog entry, there are some possibilities to sit at “The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, try to sit on a chair in the house (although it might be difficlut to climb up *winks*) or just ride on a sheep or on the wolf (you can be the predator or the prey). On the top of some rocks you can also sit, yet instead of sitting you move, be it hopping or dancing, and it is fun!

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (3)

Thank you Cica for another nice installation, that made me smile once again.

Landmark to The Girl Who Cried Wolf by Cica Ghost
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Never/222/133/26
Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica’s The Girl Who Cried Wolf”
https://modemworld.me/2018/09/13/cicas-the-girl-who-cried-wolf/

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