Simploring 2018 (82) Destiny Gardens

Inspired once again by scoop.it SL Destinations and the pictures published by AJ (anyajurelle) in her blog “AJ’s Second Life – Travel Guide” I had a look at Inara Pey’s blog post “Destiny Gardens in Second Life” and decided to visited Destiny Gardens.

Impressions of Destiny Gardens (1) – around the landing point

Destiny Gardens is a full, moderate sim owned by Destiny Milos and as I learned from Inara’s post it was primarily landscaped by Adalynne Romano (AdalynneReed). To put it in one word – it is just beautiful!
At the landing point are places to sit and to play chess and I discovered a sculpture created by Mistero Hifeng. During my visit I came across of some more of Mistero Hifeng’s sculptures, most of them I had seen before. They add perfectly into the beautiful environment. The landing point area, that is located on a hill, I went down to the shore and took the trail that leads you around the island and into the inside.

Impressions of Destiny Gardens (2)

I personally was overwhelmed by the views. The ground is covered by blooming wild flowers, the trees are planted thoughtfully to provide shade and to add to the composition of colours. The trails lead over all kinds of bridges that you’d expect in a garden. And there are a lot more places to stop and sit down admiring the beauty of nature, a true virtual paradise.

Impressions of Destiny Gardens (3) – around the two residential houses

Exploring Destiny Gardens you will find 2 residential homes that blend in perfectly, their roofs are covered with moss, their own gardens are neat and offer more places to sit again.

Impressions of Destiny Gardens (4)

I also found an French garden with accurate cut hedges and, what a contrast, with several buxus cut into the form of a bunny. Behind the formal garden is another patio that invites to sit down and relax.

Impressions of Destiny Gardens (5)

I spent an hour admiring Destiny Gardens and taking pictures and had a very enjoyable time. Thank you, Destiny Milos for providing your lovely place to the public.

Landmark to Destiny Gardens
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Destiny/62/59/38
Inara Pey’s blog post “Destiny Gardens in Second Life”
http://modemworld.me/2018/09/04/destiny-gardens-in-second-life/
Pictures of Destiny Gardens in “AJ’s Second Life – Travel Guide”
http://ajssecondlife.wordpress.com/2018/09/19/destiny-gardens/

Simploring 2018 (80) The Girl Who Cried Wolf by Cica Ghost

I got an invite from Cica Ghost to visit her newest installation, called “The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, that opened September 13th. In the landmark description Cica explains the title of her work “Modification of Aesop’s fable The Boy Who Cried Wolf“. I admit that I’m not very familiar with fables and I never heard about this one, hence I looked it up at wikipedia:

The “Boy Who Cried Wolf” is one of Aesop’s Fables. Aesop’s Fables, or the Aesopica, is a collection of fables credited to Aesop, a slave and storyteller believed to have lived in ancient Greece between 620 and 564 BCE. Of diverse origins, the stories associated with his name have descended to modern times through a number of sources and continue to be reinterpreted in different verbal registers and in popular as well as artistic media.
The tale concerns a shepherd boy who repeatedly tricks nearby villagers into thinking wolves are attacking his flock. When a wolf actually does appear and the boy again calls for help, the villagers believe that it is another false alarm and the sheep are eaten by the wolf. In later English-language poetic versions of the fable, the wolf also eats the boy. The moral stated at the end of the Greek version is, “this shows how liars are rewarded: even if they tell the truth, no one believes them”. (exerpt from wikipedia)

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (1)

Before I visited “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” on Friday, September 14th, I read Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica’s The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, that was published on September 13th. Inara talked with Cica about her newest installation and Cica explained her ideas and thoughts behind it. I recommend reading Inara’s post before visiting.

My visit was short but very enjoyable. The installation is set on a rocky but not meagre island. When you walk from the landing point to the center of the island you first see the wolf hunting the sheep. A flock of birds is flying above the scene. The sheeps and the wolf are running that fast that they hoover above the ground. The only sheep that is safe from the wolf is significantly a black sheep on the top of one rock. Not far from this scene you find the girl who cried wolf. She looks scared and points to the sheep looking at a boy sitting on a rock and playing a flute. As opposed to the girl, he seems not to be impressed, nor willing to interfer. Just behind him is a little house with a garden, the village from the fable.

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (2)

Cica has developed her very own style and the girl and the boy look very “Cica-ish”. I wouldn’t have recognized the sheep and the wolf as her work at the first glance though. The flowers, that are spread over the sim, are those Cica already used in her installation Bees and Bears (read here) And you will find again one of Cica’s 50 cats (read here), it sits on the roof of the house. Like in many of her installations before humans are really short compared to everything else. This way you experience an other point of view, maybe more respectfully.

As Inara mentioned in her blog entry, there are some possibilities to sit at “The Girl Who Cried Wolf“, try to sit on a chair in the house (although it might be difficlut to climb up *winks*) or just ride on a sheep or on the wolf (you can be the predator or the prey). On the top of some rocks you can also sit, yet instead of sitting you move, be it hopping or dancing, and it is fun!

Impressions of “The Girl Who Cried Wolf” by Cica Ghost (3)

Thank you Cica for another nice installation, that made me smile once again.

Landmark to The Girl Who Cried Wolf by Cica Ghost
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Never/222/133/26
Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica’s The Girl Who Cried Wolf”
https://modemworld.me/2018/09/13/cicas-the-girl-who-cried-wolf/

Simploring 2018 (67) Daydream by Cica Ghost

Today’s entry is a bit out of the more or less chronical order of our blog. The reason is that Cica Ghost opened her newest installation “Daydream” on August 10th. I got an invite from her and I visited Saturday, August 11th. As you never know how long Cica’s installations stay opened until she creates something new, I decided to publish my report timely, so that there’s enough time for you to visit yourself.
The thought Cica gives us on our way visiting “Daydream” is in the short landmark description “Lose yourself in a daydream…

Impression of “Daydream by Cica Chost” (1)

Daydream is an island, but this time it is not meagre although there’re some hills and rock. You’ll find colourful trees and quite some lovely fields of flowers. The landing is quite in the middle of the sim from where you can discover it on foot. I didn’t find any of the famous Cicamobiles this time.

Impression of “Daydream by Cica Chost” (2)

Daydream offers a broad spectrum of know and unknown characters and beings created by Cica nicely spread over the island and you encounter them on your way exploring it. Quite close to the landing are two snails in a field of flowers. They look at eachother and the scene is very peaceful. As always Cica’s beings are quite large. There are two turtles and they even don’t mind when you walk on their carapace.
For me the two creatures, that look like big squirrels and eat strawberries, were really impressive and although they look like little dinosaurs there are not scary at all. There’s one being, I want to mention in particular, a crossbred of a goat and an eagle with an human face, sitting on a rock like supervising the whole island and the scenery. You can see it from the landing point and from other spots on the island.

Impression of “Daydream by Cica Chost” (3)

At Daydream you will find a few places to sit and even to cuddle. One of these plaves is s cave in a single quite outstanding tree, which is even furnished. But there’re some more, just look out!
Another element of Daydream are Cica’s cats (well know from her installation 50 cats, read here in this blog). Some of them roam around at Daydream and made me smile.

Apropos smile, Daydream seems not to have a really strong message, it is a dream, a place to let your mind wander, to enjoy new and old elements of Cica’s work, it’s colourful, whimsical, and peaceful.
I don’t want to forget that Cica herself immersed into Daydream disguised as a black cat. I found her close to the landing point and I assume that she’s sticks around there daydreaming when she’s online.

Impression of “Daydream by Cica Chost” (4)

Inara Pey has already published a blog post about her visit and as always it is quite elaborated and I recommend reading it “Cica’s Dayfream in Second Life“)

Thank you, Cica for your newest installation. As always I enjoyed my visit and I really liked what I saw, so much to discover!

Landmark to “Daydream by Cica Ghost”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Never/114/114/30
Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica’s Dayfream in Second Life”
https://modemworld.me/2018/08/10/cicas-daydream-in-second-life/

An inside look at Get the Freight Out in Second Life

It’s really amazing. After more than 10 years being in Second Life I still learn about new corners of this virtual world. The broad variety of communities and possible activities seem to be endless. Just tink of sailing, flying, building fantasy worlds, art, Gor, fashion, music events, relay of life, history ….
And today I read about Get the Freight Out (GTFO), a popular in-world game among many vehicle users, in Inara Pey’s blog. It’s not that I’m going to try it out, I’m way to busy already with my Second Life family within the BDSM communities and with my simploring activities. But I wanted to share this very interesting blog post about GTFO. Thank you Inara for your very detailed post, which is a real teaser.

Inara Pey: Living in a Modem World

Get the Freight Out (GTFO) is a popular in-world game among many vehicle users. HUD-based, it allows players to “haul” cargo from by land, sea or air, point-to-point across the mainland continents of Second life, and over their connected waterways and seas (e.g. Blake Sea). In doing so, players can earn in-game (and non-redeemable) “Goal dollars” – G$ and game experience points which allow them to “level up” through GTFO.

Since its launch, the game has grown to encompass, at the time of writing, over 280 different land, sea and air vehicles, and has over 300 “hubs”- the points at which players use to collect / deliver their cargoes – scattered around the Mainland continents of the grid, presenting players with multiple opportunities for collecting and delivering cargoes, with more being added all the time.

In fact, such is the popularity of the game that many vehicle creators are offering…

View original post 2,259 more words

Simploring 2018 (60) Rusted Farm

For my short simploring tour on Sunday, July 8th, I dediced to follow Inara Pey’s simploring tours and visited Rusted Farm. Inara’s blog post “A Rusted Farm in Second Life” is quite elaborated and detailled and a good preparation for a visit.


Rusted Farm is an installation by Terrygold and is located at Solo Arte, an initiative for the encouragement, diffusion and promotion of art in Second Life, that was founded by Μelania (melaniabis), but as far as I could find out, Terrygold herself is co-owning it.

I will refrain from writing a descriptive blog post about Rusted Farm, instead I want to refer to Inara Pey’s post about it. I enjoyed my visit very much. Besides the messages that Rusted Farm wants to spread and besides the thoughts and awarenesses that Terrygold wants to initiate I was facinated by the rusted recycle insects and robots.

Impressions of Rusted Farm by Terrygold (1)

They are very detailled and look different from every viewing angle. In particular I recommend to play a bit with the windlight time setting and to look at them at night. They glow or have LED’s and add a particular, strange atmosphere to the scenery. But that’s something pictures can’t really capture, so you have to do that on your own.

Impressions of Rusted Farm by Terrygold (2)

Thank you Terrygold for this installation, I enjoyed my visit a lot!

Landmark to Rusted Farm
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Casvian%20Caye/104/5/2992
Inara pey’s blog post about Rusted Farm
https://modemworld.me/2018/07/07/a-rusted-farm-in-second-life/

Simploring 2018 (54) San Monique

For my simploring tour on Thursday, June 21st, I selected San Monique. Inara Pey wrote an excellent report about San Monique in her blog “A touch of Live and Let Die in Second Life“, that tempted me to visit it myself.

San Monique is a fictional Caribbean island and besides New Orleans one of the major sites of the plot of the James Bond film “Live and let die” from 1973. In Second life Zakk Lusch and They Wray DoneAway (They Ellisson) created a sim with a touch of New Orleans and the Bayou region of Louisiana. At San Monique you’ll find a lot of elements and references to the Bond film, be it the restaurant “Fillet of Soul” or the skull and top hat on a grave that are a reference to Baron Samedi. You’ll find some crocodiles and airboats and many more little details that hint to the film.
For those not familiar with the film “Live and let die” or those who don’t remember it anymore in detail like myself, I recommend to read about the plot in wikipedia.

Impressions of San Monique – the old plantation

But San Monique is not just about the Bond film. It is a beautiful and picturesque island in an extraordinairy style, not Mediterrean but Bayou. The center with the houses built above the water with the wooden board walks looks like being from another time and has a morbid charme. You can walk over wooden pathways into the swamps and over to an old plantage villa. I liked in particular the long driveway with the alley leading to the villa, that reminded me of the driveway in the film “Gone with the wind”. The villa itself has become shabby and again adds to the morbide charme of San Monique.

Impressions of San Monique – around the center

Impressions of San Monique – around the chapel

Exploring San Monique you encounter several persons, like the fisherman in the center, two childs sitting on a bench next to the ruins of a fun park, a clown, a band playing in the restaurant “Fillet of Soul” or the two pallbearer at the archway leaging to the chapel. Often these persons greet you in main chat and they liven up the scenery.

Impressions of San Monique – Restaurant “Fillet of Soul” / two kids / in the swamps

various impressions of San Monique

I also took some pictures posing next to crocodiles or fishing and I enjoyed exploring the swamps totally riskless and safe. San Monique is really unique. Thank you Zakk and They for creating this gem and providing it to the public for us all to enjoy.
I’ll end this post with a quote from the notecard, that you can grab at the landing point and that is taken from the Bond film: In the infamous words of Baron Samedi, “It’s going to be a beautiful day!”

Landmark to San Monique
https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Tumbleweed/132/35/15
Inara Pey’s blog post about San Monique “A touch of Live and Let Die in Second Life”
https://modemworld.me/2018/06/19/a-touch-of-live-and-let-die-in-second-life/
Wikipedia about “Live and let die”
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_and_Let_Die_(film)

Simploring 2018 (41) Cicamobiles

I came across a little exhibtion of Cica Ghost’s litte cars following Inara Pey’s blog where she published “Cica at Paris Metro in Second Life” on May 1st. And since I discovered Cica Ghost’s art in Second Life I try not to miss any of her installations or exhibtions.
There are some elements in Cica’s art installations that are unique and you recognize her objects and creations immediately. There are these fantastic, mostly oversized, animals with a human expressions in their faces, often looking content and happy or expressing strong feelings. And there are her two-dimensional stick figures, which are often animated. In Cica’s latest installations she offered little cars to drive around which were adapted to the theme. At Paris METRO Art Gallery these cars are exhibited and I called them “Cicamobiles”.

“Cicamobiles” at Paris METRO Art Gallery: Catomoblie with animated picture “Night traveler” in the background (upper right) / MouseCar and BirdCar with animated pictures “She” and “He” in the background, on the left is the animated “cyclist on the wall” (upper right) / UmbrellaCar (lower left) / FlowerCar (lower right)

It’s not a big exhibition but it is nice to see all the cicamobiles together at one place and seeing them remembered me of my visits to Cica’s installations. In total there are 4 drivable cars (Catomobile, MouseCar, BirdCar, FlowerCar) and 3 non-drivable cars (UmbrellaCar, CrocoCar, Cica’s Bus) exhibited at Paris METRO Art Gallery.
At the entrance, just next to the Catomobile you see Cica’s animated picture “Night traveler” and on the other side appears “cyclist on the wall”, one of her famous stick figures. At the wall behind the MouseCar and the BirdCar are two more animated stick figures riding bicycles named “She” and “He”.

“Cicamobiles” at Paris METRO Art Gallery: Cica’s Bus (upper left) / CorcoCar (upper right) / Cicamoblies overview (lower left) / animated pictures “She” and “He” closeup (lower right)

A really small but nice exhibtion which made me look forward seeing Cica’s next work, hopefully soon.
Thank you, Cica!
Thank you rfb morpock, who founded the Paris METRO Art Gallery and thank you, Shiloh Emmons, Director of the Gallery.

Landmark to Paris METRO Art Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Paris%20Couture/129/25/22
Inara Pey’s blog post “Cica at Paris Metro in Second Life
https://modemworld.me/2018/05/01/cica-at-paris-metro-in-second-life/

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