Diary 2020 (66) May 6th/7th Getting deeper again

I met with Mistress Jenny for one hour in the afternoon on Wednesday, May 6th, and it became an intensive hour for me. I had changed into shorts, a white blouse and overknee boots but I had to take off the blouse again and Mistress put me into the armbinder venus corset. Then we went to Heavy Bondage club and talked about the roleplay the night before. Mistress had enjoyed it, hence it might go on.
But I could also sense that Mistress was in a dominant mood and she destroyed all doubt about it. I had to wear my Ehesklavin tag again and she kept me restricted at Heavy Bondage Club. She also ordered me to take off the overknee boots and to wear ballet boots. One of Mistress’ rules is that slaves either wear no shoes at all or ballet boots and I am her married slave. And she made it very clear that I will regret it if I don’t comply to it during the red light.
The hour went over quickly and we returned to the loft skybox, where Mistress Jenny stored me in the glass cage at the wall close to her throne. I was already getting deep into subspace again.

May 6th: Mistress Jenny and Ehesklavin Diomita at Heavy Bondage Club and at our loft skybox

At night Mistress released me from the glass cage and made me lick her to earn getting off the armbinder corset. I must have done well because she unlocked it and allowed me to wear the blouse again. And she cares about my addiction and that I stay addicted to her. Thank you, Mistress.

We went home and found slave Gwendi, slave Flo and slave Luci playing greedy and we joined in. After the game we decided to go to Gravity’s Wednesday party at Caged Elegance. And slave slut cecy joined us there soon after we arrived. We had fun and I found time to talk to all of them a bit. That is the upside of dancing in Second Life. The music was great as always. We had a relaxed time and Gravity played until flotime.

May 6th: Mistress Jenny and Ehesklavin Diomita at our loft skybox / Dancing at Caged Elegance with slave Gwendi, slave Flo, slave Luci and slave slut cecy / in our skybox at home

After the slaves were off to bed, Mistress Jenny and I spent a few minutes at club Domme a Domme. We were both tired after the roleplay the night before had kept us up way too long and hence we went back home and called it a night.

Thursday, May 7th, Mistress Jenny and I met in the afternoon again for 45 minutes. We spent the time at Heavy Bondage Club mainly just chatting and catching up with our mutual news. We were that busy talking that I even forgot to take a picture, but there are many of those pictures in the blog already *winks*

I had an invitation from Cica Ghost to visit “Social Distancing by Bryn Oh and Cica Ghost” and I did in the afternoon. As the name already gives away it is an installation that deals with the current situation in our RL and it does so with a whimsical smile (read here about this installation).
In the early afternoon I made another simploring tour and visited Hotel del Salto, the new sim of Jade Koltai. It is once again a sim that was built after a real place and I enjoyed my visit a lot and I was impressed (read my simploring report here).

At night Mistress Jenny and I met slave Flo and slave gwendi at the greedy table and we joined their game. When we were finished Ann came by and we had a longer chat with her in a relaxed atmosphere. As the slaves were not much restricted it was an opportunity to do something totally different from our normal activities. I took Mistress Jenny and the slaves to “Social Distancing by Bryn Oh and Cica Ghost” first and later to Hotel del Salto. It was fun and Mistress and the slaves enjoyed doing something different.

May 7th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita at home with Ann, slave Flo and slave Gwendi / Mistress Jenny, Diomita, slave Flo and slave Gwendi visiting Hotel del Salto

It was not yet flotime when we returned and hence we went to Psi’s realm just to wind down a bit before slave Flo and slave Gwendi went to bed. Mistress Jenny and I went to Puerto Esclava for a few minutes and then went to bed ourselves.

May 7th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita at Psi’s realm with slave Flo and slave Gwendi / at Puerto Esclava

Simploring 2020 (36) Hotel del Salto

For my simploring tour Thursday, May 7th, I picked Hotel del Salto from scoop.it SL Destinations. Hotel del Salto in Second Life is owned by Jade Koltai who also designed this place on a moderate homestead.
Jade Koltai built many extraordinairy places together with Serene Footman, places you usually never get to, weired and outstanding places with history. They both now make their own designs (at least for the time being). Last year I visited Huntington Beach by Jade Koltai and I was excited about it (read here).

To say it right in the beginning. I am also excited about Hotel del Salto. Once again it is a place in Second Life that was built after a place in the physical world. It is “a hotel built in 1923 by a French architect with a view of a waterfall, being also the discharge of the sewers of Bogota in Colombia. Other legends haunt this place” (landmark description)

Hotel del Salto – overview / at the landing point

The Hotel Del Salto was previously built as a mansion in 1923. The architect who added the magnificence to the design of the Mansion was Carlos Arturo Tapias. The exterior was designed by using French architecture. In 1928 the Mansion was rebuilt as a luxurious Hotel Del Salto. The major reason to build this hotel was to attract the well-off travellers visiting the amazing Tequendama Falls. (source: worldfortravel) The Tequendama Falls (Spanish: Salto del Tequendama) is a 132 metres (433 ft) high waterfall of the Bogotá River, located 32 kilometres (20 mi) southwest of Bogotá (source: wikipedia).

Hotel del Salto and Tequendama Falls, Columbia

The hotel was abandoned in the 1990ies most probably because of the smell of the Bogotá River, which was one of the dirtiest rivers in the world. But there were also stories that the hotel was  haunted maybe because the waterfalls also attracted people who committed suicide.
Nowadays the Hotel del Salto is a museum for biodiversity and it is again a tourist attraction.

WoW … the first impression when you land on the street that leads to the hotel is already overwhelming. You see this outstanding building on the edge of a deep canyon, the moutains in the background, the atmosphere is a bit hazy, the nature is flourishing.

Jade built the hotel not in its state of today but as the ruin that it was for many years. The nature has taken back the building, grass is growing through the cracks of the ground, windows are broken, ceilings broken. Nonetheless when you go inside you can still grasp how luxurious it once was.

Hotel del Salto – outside and inside

Hotel del Salto – inside

But that is by far not all. Exploring the waterfalls and the canyon is great fun and from what I saw on pictures of the real place, it is quite well how it looks in reality. But in Second life you can hike without any danger of falling. From the hotel stairs lead down into the canyon. On the half way down is the first lookout to the waterfalls and it is a really nice play to stay and take a break.

Hotel del Salto – Impressions of exploring the Canyon (1)

You can decide to continue your walk over the high bridge or further down to the canyon. I went down first and enjoyed the view looking up. And I went very close to the waterfall and literally got wet by the spray of the falls. In the canyon there’s another terrace which was well visited during my visit.

Hotel del Salto – Impressions of exploring the Canyon (2)

Walking over the high bridge takes you the the opposed side of the hotel and there’re again several outlooks. At one I stayed a bit longer and even had a short conversation amoung tourists with a guy who sat there enjoying the view. I couldn’t get enough of this canyon and the views!

Hotel del Salto – a break with view on the falls

I went back to the hotel and walked to the side opposed to the falls. And there I found another outlook, well hidden by dense bushes. That’s “my” place there *winks*.

Hotel del Salto – more impressions and my favourite spot

I recommend to read about the Tequendama Falls and about the hotel (a good first source is the text in worldfortravel or the website of thevintagenews that is mentioned in the landmark description) before you visit. It will add to your experience when you visit Hotel del Salto in Second Life.

Thank you Jade for another great place, that I might never see in reality. But now I feel as if I’ve been there already. What a great trip in these crazy times.

Landmark to Hotel del Salto
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Costa%20Verde/203/220/95
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/delsalto/
Hotel des Salto
https://www.worldfortravel.com/hotel-del-salto-tequendama-falls-columbia/
Hotel del Salto
https://www.thevintagenews.com/2016/08/06/colombias-haunted-hotel-del-salto-despite-beauty-papers-reported-several-cases-suicides/
Tequendama Falls
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tequendama_Falls

Simploring 2019 (113) Huntington Beach

Saturday, October 26th, I visited Huntington Beach. I got the landmark once again by following scoop.it SL Destinations. The landmark description is a cross reference to Huntington Beach in the physical world: “Huntington Beach is a seaside city in Orange County in Southern California, located 35 miles southeast of Downtown Los Angeles“. It further contains the link to timeline article with pictures “Photos: Dark beauty in the oil fields of old Southern California“. This article and the pictures in it inspired Jade Koltai to create Huntington Beach in Second Life.

Huntington Beach is named after American businessman Henry E. Huntington. The population is about 200,000. It is known for its long 9.5-mile (15.3 km) stretch of sandy beach, mild climate, excellent surfing, and beach culture (source wikipedia)
I have been in Huntington Beach in the early 1990’s and I remember seeing long wide beaches, surfers and many overground powerlines (in Europe powerlines are mostly subterrestrial) disturbing the view. I knew that California not only had a gold rush but also large oil occurrences that were depleted during the 20th century. But I was not aware how the California beach looked like in the 1920’s and 1930’s. If you look up the above mentioned timeline article you will get an idea!

Some impressions of Huntington Beach, CA

Jade Koltai, the owner of Huntington Beach, created a sim that gives us an idea about how Huntington Beach might have looked like in the 1950’s. In the virtual world of Second Life we’re able to travel the world and to travel in time.

Huntington Beach in Second Life – overiew

Huntington Beach is a (moderate) homestead consisting of four main parts: the pier, the beach, the town and the field of oil derricks. The landing point is at the pier, which is quite famous in Huntington Beach. The original Huntington Beach Pier was built in 1904. With it’s length of 1,850 feet (560 m) it is one of the longest public piers on the West Coast. The pier in Second Life is way shorter and just offers a snack bar and some opportunities to sit. I met Jade Koltai there and we had a short chat.

Impressions of Huntington Beach (1) – at the landing point

The town right next to the pier offers a motel with a pool and a tennis court and quite some shops: a pet shop, a barber shop, a toys shop, a butchery, a clothes shop, a donut shop, a cheese shop and a confectionery. All of them are furnished and it is fun to have a look inside of them.

Impressions of Huntington Beach (2) – the motel and the shops

There’s also a large gas station and an abandoned drive in movie theatre. Next to the gas station is a quite large red building with on open court. It could be a restaurant as there’re some tables and chairs in the court but for sure you can dance in the court (there’re couple animations for dancing available). Last but not least there’s a trailer park at one end of the town.
The whole town has a little bit morbid charme as you can sense how flourishing it was in the 1950’s and that it is in decline.

Impressions of Huntington Beach (3) – the trailer park, the shops, the abandoned drive in movie theatre and the event area

Directly adjacent to the town is the field of oil derricks. Because there’re so many they are really scaring. You get an idea that it was not at all environmentally beneficial. I walked a along the derricks and made quite some pictures also using another windlight setting to get a more threatening atmosphere.

Impressions of Huntington Beach (4) – the field of oil derricks

Finally I visited the beach. Here you get an impression of how beach life was with the derricks in the background. Intriguing!

Impressions of Huntington Beach (5) – the oil derricks and the beach

I enjoyed my visit to Huntington Beach. The sim offers a lot of opportunities to sit and cuddle, to explore, to take pictures and to enjoy yourself. And for me it also was quite instructional in addition. It made me read about the oil rush in the 1920’s and 1930’s. Thank you Jade for creating Huntington Beach in Second Life and for sharing it with the public.

Landmark to Huntington Beach
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Prohibition/89/215/26
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/huntingtonrigs/
Huntington Beach in Wkipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huntington_Beach,_California
Timeline article “Photos: Dark beauty in the oil fields of old Southern California”
https://timeline.com/photos-dark-beauty-in-the-oil-fields-of-old-southern-california-f8aea365d38d

Simploring 2019 (75) North Brother Island

On June 29th Serene Footman and Jade Koltai opened their newest sim, North Brother Island, “the last unknown place in New York City…
Serene and Jade’s passion is to make forgotten or weired places known to a broader public and in particular to make them accessible, so that you can expierence them, so that you can immerse yourself in these places and in their history.

North Brother Island is located in the East River between Bronx and Rikers Island (a prison island). North Brother Island has an area of about 13 acres. It was not inhabited until 1885. It then was used for isolating small pox and typhiod patients. After World War II, the buildings of the isolation clinic at North Brother Island were used for young drug addicts until the facilities were closed in 1963. Since then the island is uninhabited again, the nature is taking it back and the buildings rot.

some historic pictures of North Brother Island

Before visiting I strongly recommend reading Serene’s blogpost about North Brother Island. It contains a lot of information along with pictures, maps, videos and links.

I heard about North Brother Island before and I already read quite a lot about it. North Brother Island is also the place of the biggest ship disaster in American history. On June 15, 1904, the PS General Slocum, a sidewheel passenger steamboat, caught fire and sank in the East River of New York City at the shore of North Brother Island causing the death of more tham 1,000 people, most of them children with German roots. The ship had been chartered by St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church in the Little Germany district of Manhattan. Read more about this disaster at Wikipedia.

North Brother Island in Second Life – overview and first impressions

Back to North Brother Island itself. Serene and Jade reconstructed some of the major buildings of the clinic and the big rusted crane at the pier. Although it is dangerous to visit the island and enter the rotten buildings in reality, in Second Life you’re safe. Some of the left overs, that are shown in the pictures in Serene’s blogpost, like the chair with the many books on the floor around it, can also be seen in Second Life. But Serene also made use of the artistic freedom and added some other oddities, like a vase with flowers in one window.

Impressions of North Brother Island in Second Life (1)

The main experience is to walk through the dense vegetation and to come across a large building all of a sudden. It’s hard to take a picture of whole buildings due to the vegetation and I assume that is quite like it is in reality. You can see how the nature took back the place. North Brother Island is also a bird sanctury nowadays.

Impressions of North Brother Island in Second Life (2)

There are also some spots to sit and watch. That’s perfect for taking in the whole atmosphere, for thinking about the dramas that happened here. The buildings could tell a lot of stories, like the one of Mary Mallon, or “Typhoid Mary” (1869-1938). Serene wrote about her in his blogpost.

Impressions of North Brother Island in Second Life (3)

I did not only go into every building, I also walked around the island on the shore side and discovered some more spots to sit and watch the birds. In RL you would see the skyline of NY City very close from the shore and this certainly adds to the oddity of this island. My main source of information about North Brother Island is a German blog about New York history and I’ll add the link here. Even if you don’t understand German, there’re a lot more historical pictures of it. In this post you find more links, one leads to a collection of pictures of North Brother Island taken in 2011.

Impressions of North Brother Island in Second Life (4)

Thank you Serene and Jade for another great place to discover and to learn about. My visit inspired me to restart my own research of New York history.

Landmark to North Brother Island
https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Arcole/23/163/22
Serene Footman’s blogpost about North Brother Island
https://furillen.org/2019/06/29/north-brother-island/
Wikipedia entry about the General Slocum disaster
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PS_General_Slocum
German blogpost with a lot of historic pictures of North Brother Island
http://nygeschichte.blogspot.com/2013/11/north-brother-island.html
collection of pictures of North Brother Island
http://kingstonlounge.blogspot.com/2011/01/north-brother-island-riverside-hospital.html

Simploring 2019 (35) Ukivok

On March 24th Serene Footman and Jade Koltai opened their newest sim named Ukivok. And again they take us to a place far away, a place I never heard of before, a place still exsistent but forgotten and abandoned. Ukivok is located on King Island, an island in the Bering Sea, around 64 km off the Alaskan coast, a rocky island that it just 2,5km long and 2,2km wide. It was once home for about 200 Inupiat, who lived there during the Winter months particularly for hunting and fishing on the ice. Since 1970 Ukivok is abandoned, but the stilt houses of the village are still there.

Impressions of Ukivok (1) – overview and landing point

Before you visit Ukivok, I strongly recommend that you visit Serene and Jade’s website and read the blog post about Ukivok: “Ukivok, and the People of the Sea“. Serene has collected a lot of information about Ukivok and the Inupiat, pictures of Ukivok and videos and some background information regarding how the Inupiat lived there, about their traditions as well as about why Ukivok was abandoned finally.

Impressions of Ukivok (2) – at the landing point

Ukivok in Second Life gave me an impression of the village in reality. There once were 2 larger buildings, a school and a church. The school does still exsist while the church has fallen apart. In SL you’ll find both buildings. High above the village there’s a statue of Christ the King, the Inupiat (they call themselves Aseuluk) were Catholics and this statue is also there in reality.

Impressions of Ukivok (3) – exploring the village / old school house (lower right)

In Ukivok in Second Life you’ll can also see an “Alaskan Stonehedge”, a completely natural group of single rocks and this is once again a feature of the real King Island. Last but not least the Inupiat had a ropeway to transport goods from or to the sea level. In Second life this ropeway is a bit longer, actually it is a zipline and added just for fun.

Impressions of Ukivok (4) – exploring the village / old church (lower right)

Walking through Ukivak is a challenge even in Second Life, but exploring in the virtual world is safe, you won’t get hurt, even when you fall. You have to look out how to get from one level of the village to the next, there are stairs and ladders. The small podests in from of half brocken houses offer a lot of opportunities to sit and enjoy, to listen to the sound of the many birds, which are the main inhabitants of Ukivok nowadays, or to simply inhale the particular atmosphere of this place.

Impressions of Ukivok (5) – statue of Christ the King, “Alaskan Stonehedge”, at the zipline

Impressions of Ukivok (6) – Diomita having fun sliding down the zipline / more impressions

I mainly used my personal standard windlight setting (Annan Adored Realistic Ambient) but I doesn’t reflect the uniqueness of Ukivok, the cold and the loneliness, well enough. I played a bit with other settings and added a few of these experimental pictures.

Ukivok – playing with the windlight settings

The blogpost about Ukivok is very instructive and being able to visit the village right after reading is an experience that you can only have in a virtual world like Second Life. Thank you Serene and Jade, you really make use of the possibilities of SL. Very impressive once again!

Landmark to Ukivok
https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Dulcis/227/118/22
Blogpost with all information about Ukivok
https://furillen.org/2019/03/24/ukivok-and-the-people-of-the-sea/
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/ukivok/

Simploring 2019 (17) Chesapeake Bay

Forget me not, is all I ask.” is inscripted on the grave slab of Effie L. Wilson, who was born Jan. 16th, 1880 and died Oct. 12th, 1893 on Holland Island which is located the Cheseapeake Bay. She just became 13 years old. Holland Island itself is mostly sunken, just some sandbanks are left and might vanish soon as well as hundreds of other islands did in the Chesapeake Bay.

Stephen White, a waterman and Methodist Minster, fought more than 15 years trying to save Holland island and the last house remaining of once 60 houses which were inhabitated by more than 400 people in the 19th century. He lost this fight. The last house sunk in 2010. But he did succeed in one thing: Effie L. Wilson isn’t forgotten.

Holland Island in the Chesapeake Bay – real and virtual

This and other stories around the many sunken islands inspired Serene Footman and Jade Koltai to re-erect not only Holland Island in the state shortly before the last house was swallowed by the sea.
Serene and Jade also added a lighthouse from Sharps Island which still peeks out of the water while Sharps Island itself sank in 1960, somewhat earlier than Holland Island. And they added a popular hotel that was built on the island and sank with it.

Sharps Island in the Chesapeake Bay – real and virtual

Serene Footman published a very interesting and instructive article about the sunken islands in the Chesapeake Bay and the stories behind his’ and Jade’s newest installation “Chesapeake Bay” (read “The Islands that Disappeared” on Serene’s website furillen.org). There’re many pictures of today and from the past alongside some videos for example about Stephen White and his futile fight to save the last house of Holland Island.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (1)

I strongly recommend to read and watch the Videos first before you visit “Chesapeake Bay” in Second Life. Knowing the background and some of the stories, the many lifes lived on these sunken islands lets you feel the magic of this place in the virtual world of Second Life.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (2)

Of course there’s more to explore and discover at Chesapeake Bay. Besides the historical buildings and structures there’re plenty of places to sit, mediate, chat or just enjoy the environment and the rich wildlife. Colonies of birds are living on what’s left of the Islands.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (3)

For me it was particular to visit Chesapeake Bay in Second Life, as I was in the area in the 1990ies and in the 2010ies – not aware of all of this. Serene and Jade’s transformations of particular places in the physical world into the virtual world of Second Life truely enrich my expierence. Thank you Serene and Jade!

Landmark to Chesapeake Bay
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Epsilon/191/179/21
Information and background provided by Serene Footman “The Islands that Disappeared”
https://furillen.org/2019/02/09/the-islands-that-disappeared/
Serene Footman’s website
http://www.furillen.org/

Simploring 2019 (7) Rummu

When I saw a post on scoop.it SL Destinations reporting that Serene Footman and Jade Koltai had just opened a new sim called Rummu I had to read about it and of course I had to visit it. Serene has written a very detailed documentation about Rummu, Estonia, the place they rebuilt in SL. I strongly recommend to read this documentation and to watch the documantaries embedded there. It provides the needed information to judge what you see in Second Life. It also makes your visit in Second Life getting closer to the feeling that you know this place as if you were there.

Impression of Rummu quarry, Estonia (1)

So what is Rummu? First of all it is a small borough in northern Estonia. Secondly there’s the Rummu quarry, a submerged limestone and Vasalemma marble quarry.
The latter is a specific kind of limestone with its structure and texture resembling that of marble. The quarry is close to two former prisons, the nearest being the former Rummu prison. During the Soviet era, until the 1990s, excavation was performed as hard labour prisoners. When pumping of water ceased, the quarry quickly filled with groundwater, forming a lake, immersing some of the utility buildings and machinery. Next to the lake is the Vasalemma spoil tip (slag heap). Over time, the spoil tip assumed a unique appearance through erosion by water.
With the closure of the Rummu quarry, the area became a featured location for nature photography, hiking, rafting, scuba diving, as a summer spot, musical and sports events, and as a filming location for its unique layout. The site was depicted in the post-apocalyptic short film The Most Beautiful Day (2015) by Einar Kuusk. Several of the deserted buildings at Rummu were featured in the video for hit song “Faded” (2015) by Norwegian DJ Alan Walker.
Jump-diving into the lake off derelict buildings is very dangerous, because the lake bed contains pieces of thick concrete, tree branches, rebar spikes, metal construction (including machinery), and plenty of barbed wire.“(excerpt from wikipedia)
The area is closed now officially, which doesn’t prevent people from visiting.

Impression of Rummu quarry, Estonia (2)

Serene writes about Rummu:
Those who visit Rummu and write about the experience invariably say that besides the strange beauty of the derelict buildings that lie partially submerged, it is the knowledge of what lies below the water – and the terrible history of the prison itself – that lends the place its extraordinary charisma. We have tried to recreate this combination of surface and depth. If you venture into the water and walk around, you will soon find yourself in darkness, surrounded by plants and pieces of derelict building. Keep on going down the slope, and in the depths you will reach some gates. Here you enter the prison itself, deep under the water, just as divers do today. It’s a creepy place, for sure.

Above ground, Rummu’s most striking feature consists of the giant slag heaps that were created by quarry works. These act as a great vantage point, while in the real place, they have to be crossed to gain access to the beach. Besides the ruined buildings and underwater prison, Rummu’s other distinctive feature are its murals, and we have recreated some of these – while adding others – at the sim. The biggest murals, most notably the image of the coffee cup, which exists at Rummu, appear to be the work of a Moscow-based group of artists called Zukclub.” (taken from Serene’s website)

Rummu in Second Life – overview

Enough foreword and quotes – let’s get to Rummu in SL.
Rummu is a moderate homestead. It is dominated by the lake with the rests of the prison and the quarry underwater, some concrete ruins of the former buildings still reaching high out of the water. There’s the slag heap, two big hills right next to the lake. Plants are growing on the slag heap. The lake is surrounded by beaches and some other solitaire concrete hugs buildings. The nature has taken back almost everything, plants and trees are growing out of every crack of the ruins. Some of the walls are covered artfully with murals outside and inside of the buildings.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (1)

You can walk inside of the buildings and climb up to the roos for the view and for the fun there’s a zip lane leading from one of the buildings to a ruin in the center of the lake. Serene has added reams of chairs, benches, loungers, beach furntiure, camping furniture and during my visit some of them were taken by other visitors. You can also use a Swan paddle boat, the one I saw when visiting :notos:deer: (read Simploring 2018 (106) :nostos:deer:).

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (2)

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (3)

I explored the whole sim, I visited the hut as well as the two cranes behind the slag heap. I dived and looked at the sunken prison, I went into all buildings, and i visited the ruins of a huge indoor swimming hall. I think, I won’t forget the statue there “A woman is more dangerous than a loaded pistol”, although I have no idea if it is something that belongs to the real Rummu (I think it doesn’t) nor do I know if it is build after a statue in RL.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (4)

Rummu for sure has it’s magic attraction. Having the pictures in mind that I saw in the documentaries on Serene’s website made my visit quite real. It’s great to see how people take over these really scary places and turn it into something to enjoy. That doesn’t make us forget the history but gives hope that terror and violence won’t ever be permanent.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (5)

Thank you Serene Footman and Jade Koltai for providing this once again impressive place to the public. I did really enjoy my visit!

Landmark to Rummu
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Gainesville/142/169/22
Serene Footman’s website page about Rummu
https://furillen.org/2019/01/01/welcome-to-rummu/
Wikipedia entry about Rummu quarry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rummu_quarry
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/rummusl/

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