Art in Second Life 2021 (67) Fragments by Melusina Parkin

I got an invitation to “Fragments” by Melusina Parkin, an exhibtion shown on a seperate platform of Milena’s Carbone Gallery @ Serena.

For the exhibtion “Fragments” Melusina Parkin and Milena Carbone have cooperated for the first time. Milena composed the texts, each piece inspired by one of Melusina’s images. Pieces of sentences that, put together, constitute an absurd story, but a coherent whole, like a journey of human life.

Together with the invitation I got a bunch of information. I have visited quite some exhibtions of both artists.
Melusina Parkin’s photos tend towards minimalism, which is Melu’s main inclination: simple details from daily life or usual landscapes are the subject of mostly empty scenes, stressing voids, space, geometries, lights; this reveals hidden meanings or pushes the observer to give them her/his own one. Her favorite subjects are wide landscapes, city views, industrial environments, popular lifestyles and daily objects.

“Fragments” by Melusina Parkin @ The Carbone Gallery

Melusina wrote:
The image belongs to the observer. I agree with this statement made by the recent semiology and art critics. The reasons that an artist takes a photograph or paints a picture – or is compelled to do that – aren’t the same as those that open the observers’ way to find a meaning in them. Images are just incentives to seek unconsciously in our mind a memory, a meaning, a feeling we saved into the cells of our brain, codified by a mysterious chemical language. More ambiguous images are deeper and can evoke more complex thoughts or feelings.

My photos try to offer these “links” to the observers’ minds by representing simplified, “incomplete” images. Lonely places, empty rooms, absences, silent, still, small details that we usually neglect, when shown in a large size photo can have that power. Fragments of the outer world we live in take to fragments of our inner one.

Examples of “Fragments” by Melusina Parkin with texts from Milena Carbone (1)

When Milena proposed that I show my photos at her new gallery, paired with her written reflections on them, I was curious to know what kind of thoughts they would stimulate. The result of her careful observation has been stunning: her texts reveal even the most private sides of her soul, starting from pictures that don’t belong to her past life, but are linked to her own mind’s archive by multiple hooks : so she tells her stories about an object or a landscape, or even about a color, or a light, and those stories compose a portrait showing something placed between memory, reality, imagination, dream and abstract thought.
I wish that my images could have the same effect on visitors’ souls. No other aim would be more enticing for a photographer.

Examples of “Fragments” by Melusina Parkin with texts from Milena Carbone (2)

The exhibtion consists of two parts – outside and inside. The provided landmark leads to the outside area. Melusina Parker’s pictures are featured on big single boards under the open sky. Chairs are placed in front of the boards so that you can sit down and look at the single pictures. A paved walkway leads you to a center screen, which shows the pictures one after the other in a slideshow – together with the texts, that Milena Carbone wrote.

As you walk along the paved walkway, you can read another accompanying text on the paving stones:
My life is straight as a road through the desert, and this road never stops, it goes straight in circles, it ticks off the numer that never ends. If this desert were alive, my road would be twisty, facetious, chaotic and unexpected. But wem the human species, have sterilized and flattened the earth to satisfy our appetite for perfection, geometry, purity. And all of this, now, is boring like a gray day at the office. Boring and tiring. I am sitting on the bench, exhausted and sad. Here, a circle will never be perfect, Everything we see from the outside is a story. Your life, my life, our life are fragments of stories, nothing is true, nothing is holy.

Examples of “Fragments” by Melusina Parkin with texts from Milena Carbone (3)

Milena Carbone’s texts are created using automatic writing, a surrealist technique. They are initially extracted from independent stories, sometimes autobiographical, often imaginary. Subsequently, they are reworked so that each text is linked to one or more other texts by common images, symbols or sensations.

The inside area contains what might be the other half of the pictures in a traditional gallery. In the center of the inside area you find a bookstore. Those who are regular visitors to Melusina Parkin’s exhibitions know these books already:
Melusina All-in-One Exhibits allow you to keep at home the whole exhibit you visited and loved. It’s an alternative kind of the exhibit catalogue – you can hang the object on your home’s walls and enjoy the changing images.
They come in four versions, that you can choose according to your home style: plain or framed, changing image by touch or in random loop. The objects are set as modifiable, so you can adapt them to your walls.

“Fragments” by Melusina Parkin @ The Carbone Gallery – inside area with bookstore

Milena Carbone (mylena1992) is a French artist and is in Second Life since mid 2019. She discovered its artistic potential and since then has devoted all her free time to creation, associating, as in real life, images and texts: “Milena Carbone is a fiction in which, as in any artistic work, biographical and imaginary elements are mixed.” Her creative process is iterative: some of her images inspire her stories and these stories modify the development of the image, which itself transforms the story.
Milena Carbone currently curates three own galleries: The Carbone Gallery, The Carbone Gallery @ Noir’Wen City, and The Carbone Gallery @ Serena. You can follow her on flickr and you can read some of her texts on Medium.

Melusina Parkin is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just a few. Melusina has an own gallery, an own store for Art Deco furniture “Melu Deco“, Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 13,000 (!) photographs. Extensive collections of her photos can be seen also on her blog Virtual Exhibits and on some slideshows on Youtube (links under this post).

Thank you both, Milena Carbone and Melusina Parkin for a this cooperative work, for a perfect combination of images and texts. My visit to “Fragments” was touching and inspiring – a great exhibition!

Landmark to Fragments by Melusina Parkin
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Serena%20Pontypridd/145/82/2071
The Carbone Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Woiler/172/158/3316
The Carbone Gallery @ Noir’Wen City
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Noir%20Wen/243/203/32
The Carbone Gallery @ Serena
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Serena%20Pontypridd/69/182/22
Milena Carbone’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/milenacarbone/
Milena Carbone’s texts
https://medium.com/@539568
Landmark to Melusina Photo Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Landmark to Melusina Parkin’s store for Art Deco furniture “Melu Deco”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/243/99/1930
Melusina Parker’s flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
On line book Second Life exhibits 2011-2019
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s youtube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw

Art in Second Life 2021 (59) Symphony in Red by Melusina Parkin

I visited the exhibtion “Symphony in Red” by Melusina Parkin at her Melusina Photo Gallery, that opened mid of June. The gallery is located upsatirs of Melusina Parkin’s store “Melu Deco“, that offers Art Deco furniture, lamps, rugs and home accessories. Many of the items are copies of famous 1920-40s designers’ objects.

Melusina Parkin’s photos tend towards minimalism, which is Melu’s main inclination: simple details from daily life or usual landscapes are the subject of mostly empty scenes, stressing voids, space, geometries, lights; this reveals hidden meanings or pushes the observer to give them her/his own one. Her favorite subjects are wide landscapes, city views, industrial environments, popular lifestyles and daily objects.

For her exhibtion “Symphony in Red” Melusina picked pictures that are just a bit less minimalisitc and shows “how the warm light of the afternoons, the bright colors (first, the reds!), the crowded images can be another amazing way to see our world and its details.

Impressions of “Symphony in Red” by Melusina Parkin (1)

Many of the showcased pictures reminded me of of her exhibition “Roadside”, which I visited last year (read here). Yet the red tones, the warmth of the afternoon sun, make a difference. Still Meulisna’s pictures force the viewer to focus on the main details and by this you get drawn into her pictures and begin to spin your own story around them.
I’m quite intrigued of her style and “Symphony in Red” is in my eyes another collection of masterpieces.

In the center of the exhibition room you find a table with books. Those who are regular visitors to Melusina Parkin’s exhibitions know these books already:
Melusina All-in-One Exhibits allow you to keep at home the whole exhibit you visited and loved. It’s an alternative kind of the exhibit catalogue: you can hang the object on your home’s walls and enjoy the changing images.
They come in four versions, that you can choose according to your home style: plain or framed, changing image by touch or in random loop. The objects are set as modifiable, so you can adapt them to your walls.

Impressions of “Symphony in Red” by Melusina Parkin (2)

Melusina Parkin is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just a few. Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 13,000 (!) photographs. Extensive collections of her photos can be seen also on her blog Virtual Exhibits and on some slideshows on Youtube (links under this post).

The exhibition “Symphony in Red” shall stay open for visitors at least until end of July. Enjoy your visit!

Landmark to Melusina Photo Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Landmark to Melusina Parkin’s store for Art Deco furniture “Melu Deco”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/243/99/1930
Melusina Parker’s flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
On line book Second Life exhibits 2011-2019
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s youtube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw

Art in Second Life 2021 (57) La Maison d’Aneli June/July 21

Wednesday, June 23rd, a new exhibition at La Maison d’Aneli has been opened. It features the art of Asperix Asp, Therese Carfagno, Melusina Parkin, Mistero Hifeng, Vroum Short and ChrisTower Dae.

I started my visit at the skybox of Mistero Hifeng. I think everybody, who is somehow connected to art in Second Life has come across Mistero Hifeng already. And if not – visit La Maison d’Aneli. Mistero has a very unique style which makes his 3D figures really unique. His way to break up part of his figures into pieces has become his signature. For his skybox at La Maison d’Aneli he reproduced some of his 2D artwork into 3D.
Mistero is in Second Life since 2007. You can see his art in many sims – also at our home. Mistero Hifeng’s art can be purchased at his “New Store Digital Art – Cammino & Vivo Capovolto“. He also has a flickr account.

Melusina Parkin showcases almost 30 pictures in her skybox at La Maison d’Aneli. She titled her exhibition “almost nothing”. How fitting!
Melusina Parkin’s photos tend towards minimalism, which is Melu’s main inclination: simple details from daily life or usual landscapes are the subject of mostly empty scenes, stressing voids, space, geometries, lights; this reveals hidden meanings or pushes the observer to give them her/his own one. Her favorite subjects are wide landscapes, city views, industrial environments, popular lifestyles and daily objects.
I was once again intrigued by Melusina’s style, that forces the spectator to focus on a detail and such pulls the spectator into the picture .. and you begin to make up a story in your mind.
In the center of the exhibition room you find a table with a book with all pictures showcased at La Maison d’Aneli in the exhibition “almost nothing”. Or you can get a particular display show. Those who are regular visitors to Melusina Parkin’s exhibitions know these books already:
Melusina All-in-One Exhibits allow you to keep at home the whole exhibit you visited and loved. It’s an alternative kind of the exhibit catalogue: you can hang the object on your home’s walls and enjoy the changing images.
They come in four versions, that you can choose according to your home style: plain or framed, changing image by touch or in random loop. The objects are set as modifiable, so you can adapt them to your walls.

Melusina has her own gallery, her own shop “Melu Deco”, a flickr account, a blog, an online book about her former exhibtions 2011-2019, and a youtube channel.

The opening event took place in a seperate room on the ground right where you land at La Maison d’Aneli. This room was created by Vroum Short, another artist who I covered already a few times in this blog. The room is held in black with a lot of white permanent changing light effect on the floor, the ceiling and the walls. Within the room you find little islands with penguins and the dance floor in the center. Of course there’s a dj’s desk (with an animated robo discjockey and drummer. Vroum named her room “Ice disaster”. Considering the islands on which the penguins survived, the light effects may symbolize the meling ice, the ice disaster. You can also recognize some penguins in the light effects.

I know Vroum Short as the owner of VeGeTaL PLaNeT. I peeked at it several times but never found the time to really visit it and to write an extra blog entry about it. The VeGeTaL PLaNeT also hosted Aneli Abeyante’s La Maison d’aneli for about a year. VeGeTaL PLaNeT is gone but there’s now the VeGeTaL PLaNeT Gallery (read about it here and here)
Vroum Short is a French SL artist since 2007. She works with lights and light effects, sometimes also very colourful. Vegetal Planet Gallery a world where everything becomes possible and achievable where the barriers of reality fade away to let the imagination flood it with life.
Vroum has a store for her art on the marketplace and a flickr account.

Asperix Asp is in Second Life since 2007. He’s a Spanish senior artist with 35+ years of experience in digital image, infography, rendered tridimensional fractals, virtual entorns… and had many expositions in RL and SL. For me it was the first time I came across his artwork. Asperix skybox at La Maison d’Aneli is a sphere with a transparent floor in the center of the sphere so that it is a half sphere, a dome. The sphere is textured with fractal art, some look like snails, the lights make it look like space art, the texture of the floor reminded me of the Statue of Liberty, in particular together with the Sculpture in the center of the room. Looking down through the floor you get more and other views.

Around the center sculpture Asperix arranged 8 fractals. They change permanently, hence each picture you take is a bit different. The fractals remind of mineral, of stones and for me at least are either from space or details on earth we never see. Fractals are just intriguing. To see more of Asperix work, visit Asperix’ gallery “Render4”.

Therese Carfagno came to Second Life in February 2007. Soon she got a job as a journalist, and met the most interesting artists in SL. Seeing so much creativity inspired her to start taking pictures herself. Therese thinks that taking pictures helps to look at the world a little closer – and there are so many wonders to see in SL:
“I have no interest in calling myself an artist. I take snapshots. If I’m happy with the picture because of the motive, the colours, the people in it, or anything, I upload it to Flickr or exhibit it somewhere. That’s it. And if someone else like what I do, that’s even better.”
You can see Therese Carfagno’s pictures also on her flickr account.

The pictures presented in Therese Carfagno’s skybox at La Maison d’Aneli are all but simple snapshots, at least in my opinion. The black and white pictures look very real and were in the style I expected as they fit in line with a former exhibtion of Therese Carfagno at La Maison d’Aneli. The colourful upright pictures are very artful and some seem to be a mixture between abstract pictures and portraits. I have no idea how that is made – but it is quite artistic and not just a snapshot. Chapeau, Therese.

ChrisTower Dae is in Second Life since December 2006. It’s the first time that I came across ChrisTower Dae. His passion are avatar portraits. He tries to capture the expressions that a skin can offer, that give (according to many people) a soul to the avatar and make it a personality.

ChrisTower has designed his skybox at La Maison d’Aneli like a labyrinth, yet it is not a labyrinth. The black and white structures are extraordinairy. From the ceiling, that is textured with a labyrinth too, ChrisTower has suspended his avatar portraits – not just along the walls but crisscross.
The portraits are mostly coloured, a few are in black&white. And yes, ChrisTower proves that you can create very expressive faces within Second Life, even if we all are mostly very beautiful and young. You can give your avatar a soul, make it your second appearance, make it being yourself. And I know from myself that I identify with my avatar. ChrisTower succeeds in making the soul tangible and understandable.
More of his artwork can be seen on ChrisTower Dae’s flickr account.

La Maison d’Aneli is owned by Aneli Abeyante. Through her gallery she brings together all forms of creativity in RL and SL and the featured artists come from around the globe. Aneli’s intention is to “put her gallery in the service of artists, so that the world can be better, exchanges and meetings probably contribute even though it seems to be particles.
Thank you for another great joined exhibtion, Aneli. As always I enjoyed my visit and writing about it. It always inspires me.

Landmark to La Maison d’Aneli
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Virtual%20Holland/23/59/22
Mistero Hifeng’s “New Store Digital Art – Cammino & Vivo Capovolto”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Fashion%20Boulevard/47/96/1503
Mistero Hifeng’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/incognitadelmistero/
Landmark to Melusina Photo Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Landmark to Melusina Parkin’s store for Art Deco furniture “Melu Deco”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/243/99/1930
Melusina Parker’s flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
On line book Second Life exhibits 2011-2019
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s youtube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw
Landmark to VeGeTaL PLaNeT Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Oreo/64/100/501
Vroum Short’s flickr account
https://www.flickr.com/photos/vroum_short/albums
Vroum Short’s art on marketplace
https://marketplace.secondlife.com/fr-FR/stores/81862
Asperix Asp’s gallery “Render4”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Polyakov/57/27/33
Therese Carfagno’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/carfagno
ChrisTower Dae’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/christowerdae/

Art in Second Life 2021 (47) Kinds of Minimal by Melusina Parkin

On Monday, May 16th, a new exhibtion of Melusina Parkin has been opened at Desideratum gallery. The exhibtion consists of almost 30 pictures of Melusina Parkin.

The titel of the exhibition “Kinds of Minimal” is very fitting. Her photos tend towards minimalism, which is Melu’s main inclination: simple details from daily life or usual landscapes are the subject of mostly empty scenes, stressing voids, space, geometries, lights; this reveals hidden meanings or pushes the observer to give them her/his own one. Her favorite subjects are wide landscapes, city views, industrial environments, popular lifestyles and daily objects.

It was my first visit to Desideratum Gallery, a “place of exhibitions and entertainment where the desire to have fun contemplating the art and the wonderful people of SL meet.” As far as I could find out the Desideratum Gallery is owned by Péru (Peru Venom).
It is a quite large 2-story bilding with a lot of natural light flooding in through the large class facacde. Melusina’s exhibition extends over both floors.

Impressions of “Kinds of Minimal” by Melusina Parkin (1)

There’s not much I could add about Melusina’s photo art. Maybe that I think it is amazing that you get this effect just by reducing the complexity, making the spectator focus on just a few, or even just one object, forcing the spectator to look at every single detail, even if there’s none. In addition it increases the value of the few and single objects.
Melusina’s art is a clear contrast to other styles with many layers and endless details.

Melusina is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just three. Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 13,000 (!) photographs. Extensive collections of her photos can be seen also on her blog Virtual Exhibits and on some slideshows on Youtube (links under this post). Melusina has several galleries of her own (links also under this post).

Impressions of “Kinds of Minimal” by Melusina Parkin (2)

On the ground floor you also find a table with books. Those who are regular visitors to Melusina’s exhibitions know these books already:
Melusina All-in-One Exhibits allow you to keep at home the whole exhibit you visited and loved. It’s an alternative kind of the exhibit catalogue: you can hang the object on your home’s walls and enjoy the changing images.
They come in four versions, that you can choose according to your home style: plain or framed, changing image by touch or in random loop. The objects are set as modifiable, so you can adapt them to your walls.
Last but not least you find a notecard with Melusina’s biography by clicking the picture of her above the table with the book.

The bookstore at Desideratum Gallery – “Kinds of Minimal” by Melusina Parkin

Thank you Melusina for another great exhibition, thank you Péru (Peru Venom) for providing the space for the arts. I enjoyed my visit a lot. “Kinds of Minimal” by Melusina Parkin will stay open until June 6th, 2021.

Landmark to Desideratum Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Isle%20of%20Bliss/224/160/1758
Melusina Parkin’s Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s “Second Life exhibits 2011-2019” as a book to read online
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
Slideshows of Melusina Parkin’s work on youtube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw
Melusina Parkin’s inworld gallery “Minimum Gallery” and bookstore “Melubooks”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Lunula/192/9/21
Melusina Parkin’s Photo Gallery at Time Portal
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Melusina Parkin’s studio at PAC
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Cherished%20Melody/38/34/2165

Art in Second Life 2021 (41) “Dialogues: patterns, people” @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria

Just recently I reported about Melusina Parkin and her exhibition “Wandering and Watching” at DixMix Gallery (read here). And now there’s another exhibition of her at The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria.

The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria features a “conversation” between the art work of Melusina Parkin and Whiskey Monday. The exhibtions consists of ten photographs of each artist divided in sets that “talk” to each other in the exhibition “Dialogues: patterns, people”.

“Dialogues: patterns, people” @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria

Both artists interpret the themes “patterns” and “people”. On the ground floor of The 22 Art Space is one room showcasting Melusina Parkin’s pictures showing patterns and one room showcasting Whistkey Monday’s work about patterns.
On the second floor each artist has one room on the theme “people”

“Dialogues: patterns, people @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria” – patterns by Melusina Parkin and by Whiskey Monday

 

In the accampanying notecard Ricco Saenz and Randy Firebrand, the owners and creators of The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria write: “The idea behind “Dialogues: patterns, people” is that the dialogue between Whiskey Monday’s and Melusina Parkin’s productions may underline some characteristics of each set of images. Also, it allows visitors to see the same subjects from very different points of view, recognizing that, though distinct, they can communicate, further enriching themselves.

And indeed it is intriguing to see the different interpretations of the same theme from two different perspectives. And in this direct comparision you see the difference between the two.

“Dialogues: patterns, people @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria” – people by Whiskey Monday

For me – and that is only my personal impression – Melusina focuses on minimalism. She finds the right motif within Second Life, motifs that are not disturbed by anything else. Whiskey Monday’s pictures on the other side guide the spectator to focus on the deviant spot of her picture. For example in her picture “Law of Diminishing Returns” with the many balconies and robots standing there, each one in a different pose, there is one human falling down.

The difference is even more obvious looking at the theme “people”. While Melusina takes clear and simple pictures, which seem to be unprocessed, Whiskey has a more artificial approach and presents people in in front of art backgrounds.

I have seen Whiskey Monday’s art work just once so far 2014 at a gallery named “The viewing Room” (read here). Whiskey is in Second Life since 2009. And back in 2014 Inara Pey wrote about her work “Her work is thought-provoking, intelligent, evocative, mischievous, fun, pointed, and more – and all of it is certainly some of the finest expressions of art as a medium for social and general commentary I’ve ever seen. It’s also deeply personal, much of it reflecting on Whiskey’s real life and times in a frank, honest way free from pathos while laying bare her mindset and emotions.” (see here).
Whiskey has flickr account, where you can see more of her work.

“Dialogues: patterns, people @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria” – people by Melusina Parkin

Melusina is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just two. Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 13,000 (!) photographs. Extensive collections of her photos can be seen also on her blog Virtual Exhibits and on some slideshows on Youtube (links under this post). Melusina has several galleries of her own (links also under this post).

The 22 Art space is a gallery in Bellisseria, a continent with many Second Life prime members homes. The gallery is on one of these homes. It is owned and curated by Randy Firebrand and Ricco Saenz. The gallery’s name refers to the Modern Art Week in 1922 in Brazil, also known locally as “The 22 Week”.
Thank you Ricco Saenz and Randy Firebrand for enabling and presenting this great exhition. I enjoyed my visit a lot. “Dialogues: patterns, people @ The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria” shall stay open until June 26th.

The 22 Art Space in Bellisseria
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Grenouille/60/35/35
Whiskey Monday’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/75351422@N03/
Melusina Parkin’s Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s “Second Life exhibits 2011-2019” as a book to read online
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
Slideshows of Melusina Parkin’s work on youtube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw
Melusina Parkin’s inworld gallery “Minimum Gallery” and bookstore “Melubooks”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Lunula/192/9/21
Melusina Parkin’s Photo Gallery at Time Portal
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Melusina Parkin’s studio at PAC
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Cherished%20Melody/38/34/2165

Art in Second Life 2021 (36) Wandering and Watching by Melusina Parkin

I visited the exhibition “Wandering and Watching” by Melusina Parkin at room “Amona” at DixMix Gallery. Although I had seen just two exhibitions of Melusina so far, her style is easily recognisable. Minimalistic pictures focusing on one or two details. The simplicity of her pictures is intriguing.

This time we get a lot of information by the artist herself along with the exhibtion. Right next to the entrance is a board with Melusina’s thoughts about “Wandering and Watching“:

Urban subjects are one of the main inspirations of my photographic work since my beginning as a photgrapher.
This time I wanted to show some details we could always see when we wander around in a twon: cars, buildings, buses, benches, signs, fences…. They could look meaningless when we don’t look at them closely; they fade out into the mess of the urban landscape. Nonetheless, they are the essentail ingredients of the recipe called “city” that we cook and eat every day.
I wanted to show also two possible way to observe ubran reality: some of the photos are in warm tones; shadows and subeams are protagonists of the image like in a sunny afternoon, they give to our gazes the image of a friendly environment where we can happily live; red spots call our attentions while a warm, suffused light turns us to a calm mood.
Other ones are in cooler tones: they represent the less attractive side of city life: voids, decay, lonely and sad places sunken in the light of a cloudy day. Even tehm are part of our daily life; giving them dignity of protagonists can reveal their charm; in some of them a rather vivid spot on a faded and blurred background, remeber us that sadness and happiness are always mixed up.

Impressions of “Wandering and Watching” by Melusina Parkin (1)

Also right next to the entrance you can purchase a book:
Melusina All-in-One Exhibits allow you to keep at home the whole exhibit you visited and loved. It’s an alternative kind of the exhibit catalogue: you can hang the object on your home’s walls and enjoy the changing images.
They come in four versions, that you can choose according to your home style: plain or framed, changing image by touch or in random loop. The objects are set as modifiable, so you can adapt them to your walls.
Last but not least you find a notecard with Melusina’s biography by clicking the picture of her above the table with the book.

Impressions of “Wandering and Watching” by Melusina Parkin (2)

Melusina is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just two. Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 13,000 (!) photographs. Extensive collections of her photos can be seen also on her blog Virtual Exhibits and on some slideshows on Youtube (links under this post). Melusina has several galleries of her own (links also under this post).

Her photos tend towards minimalism, which is Melu’s main inclination: simple details from daily life or usual landscapes are the subject of mostly empty scenes, stressing voids, space, geometries, lights; this reveals hidden meanings or pushes the observer to give them her/his own one. Her favorite subjects are wide landscapes, city views, industrial environments, popular lifestyles and daily objects.

Impressions of “Wandering and Watching” by Melusina Parkin (3)

Thank you Dixmix for providing and curating the DixMix Gallery, thank you Megan for building it and for contributing at it. I enjoyed my visit and seeing Wandering and Watching by Melusina Parkin. The exhibition “Wandering and Watching” by Melusina Parkin will stay open until May 7th.

Landmark to Dixmix Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Madori%20Bay/46/213/22
DixMix Gallery website
https://www.dixmixgallery.xyz/
Melusina Parkin’s Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina Parkin’s “Second Life exhibits 2011-2019” as a book to read online
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s Virtual Exhibit blog
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
Slideshows of Melusina Parkin’s work on youtube
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw
Melusina Parkin’s inworld gallery “Minimum Gallery” and bookstore “Melubooks”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Lunula/192/9/21
Melusina Parkin’s Photo Gallery at Time Portal
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Melusina Parkin’s studio at PAC
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Cherished%20Melody/38/34/2165

Art in Second Life 2020 (36) Michiel Bechir’s Art Gallery in June/July exhibitions

I got an invitation for an opening party for a new exhibtion at Michiel Bechir’s Art Gallery for Saturday, June 20th. As I had other activities at night in Second Life, I peeked in already on Thursday, June 18th.

The new exhibtion features the art of Pavel Stransky and Hazel Foxtrot on the ground level and the pictures of Jaz (Jessamine2108) on the 2nd floor.

Right at the entrance you see Michiel Bechir’s on work. Michiel has started his long virtual journey into Second Life as a photographer in 2009. Michiel enjoys seeing new places, meeting new people from all over the world and expierencing the creativity in Second Life (just like I do!). Michiel discovered the possiblities of different tools to improve his pictures. By editing them he also tries to add a personal touch and feeling. Experiments with the effect of colors are often done, and more recently he is trying to show the details by working with high resolution photos.

Michiel Bechir’s Gallery in June/July – Michiel Bechir’s own pictures

To the right from the entrance is the room with the pictures of Pavel Stransky, who joined Second Life almost 13 years ago. Pavel Stransky’s motivation to visit sims in Second Life are quite the same as Michiel’s and like Michiel he takes pictures inworld and as far as I could see, Pavel also processes his pictures. But his style is quite comparable with Michiel’s – at least from what I saw. Pavel Stransky has also a flickr account.

Michiel Bechir’s Gallery in June/July – Pavel Stransky

To the left from the entrance is the room with the pictures of Hazel Foxtrot, who is active in Second Live since 2008 and she shares the passion of taking pictures. Her motives are a bit different to those of Michiel and Pavel. 3 of her pictures reminded me of Melusina Parkin’s Roadside pictures (read here), an exhibition that I visited in May. Other picture capture the atmosphere of towns. Hazel has also a flickr account.

Michiel Bechir’s Gallery in June/July – Hazel Foxtrot

All three Michiel, Pavel and Hazel make pictures while traveling through Second Life. They find great motives and the right viewing angle to creat their art.

The exhibtion on the 2nd floor of Michiel Bechir’s Art Gallery, named Balance, is different. It combines pictures from Jaz (Jessamine2108) with poems from Zoe Ocelot. Balance is an exhibtion about the current pandemic and its effect on humans and animals as well as on nature due to the lack of pollution and cleaner air and water.
Before you enter the room you’re asked to wear a face mask, which is provided, The exhibtion has two parts, that are divided by a fence. One side shows pictures and texts from the physcial world. Very impressive is a picture from India showing the vers same place before and during the lockdown and how the air got clean. A 3D model of the earth is in the center of the room and circled by dark polluted clouds as well as be clean clouds.
On the other side of the fence you see pictures from Jaz, taken in Second Life but clearly referring to the corona pandemic.

Michiel Bechir’s Gallery in June/July – Balance by Jaz and Zoetrope Ocelot

Jaz has been doing photography in SL since 2018: “It would be more than appropriate to say that Milla (Ladmilla) introduced me to the nuances in the art. While I still have much to learn, I am enjoying every minute of it. Special thanks to Eta (Etamae Resident) for making me look at the amazing possibilities of SL and to Harry Cover (impossibleisnotfrench Resident) for giving me an opportunity and courage to branch out on my own and to be able to collaborate and experiment with mesh with him.
Jaz exhibits some of her work at her homeplace Third Eye and has an own little gallery Bohemian Imaginarium@ – two places to add to my list.

Thank you Michiel for enabling this joined exhibition, thanks to the artists for their work. I enjoyed my visit!

Landmark to Michiel Bechir’s Art Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Embrace/26/226/2502
Pavel Stransky’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/pavelstransky
Hazel Foxtrot’s flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/166901264@N04/
Jaz (Jessamine2108)’s homeplace “Third Eye”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Midnight%20Sanctum/145/226/1101
Jaz (Jessamine2108)’s gallery Bohemian Imaginarium@
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Blue%20Moon/78/120/25

Art in Second Life 2020 (33) Roadside by Melusina Parkin

For my simploring tour on Sunday, May 24th, I picked “Roadside” an exhibition of Melusina Parkin from scoop.it SL Destinations. The entry referred to a blog post from Inara Pey “Melu’s Roadside images in Second Life“. I came across Melusina just once so far. I saw an exhibtion of her at “The Last Forever – Marfa” (read here) back in 2017. Inara Pey’s blogpost made me curious to see her newer work under the title “Roadside

Roadside by Melusina Parkin at Melusina Photo Gallery

The exhibition is on a one room gallery above Melusina Parkin’s store for Art Deco furniture called Melu Deco. All the 4 walls are used to display the roughly 25 pictures. Melusina is in Second Life since September 2008. She has been a fashion manager, a journalist, a furniture creator, a builder, a decorator and a photographer. Her work as a photographer has been showcased in more than 50 exhibitions – from which I saw just the one back in 2017. Melusina has a flickr account which counts more than 12,000 (!) photographs. I know myself how SL pictures add up over time – my hard drive contains 45,000 pictures, but of course there’s a lot garbage amoung them.

Roadside by Melusina Parkin – Impressions (1)

Melusina wrote about her exhibtion “Roadside“:
Diners, motels, pump stations, garages are elements of a “road popular culture” developed in wide spaces crossed by monotone and endless roads. We can’t imagine a motorway without them. (Remark: that is clearly related to the US *winks*)
Like mountains, hills, fields, lawns and rivers, they are part of any landscape we see when traveling through the country. They can be simple wooden buidings or kitsch painted ones, and their neon signs light up the sides of the road we’re traveling, promising food and drink, bed and rest, warm fireplaces or refreshing airconditioned rooms. Smell of fuel and of fried eggs mix up in their surroundings, announcing a close stop.
They take care of our bodies and of our minds, but even of our mechanical horses.
But they’re even more: they tell us that we’re at home, that we’re not alone in the intimidating natural landscape, in the desert, in the snowy land.
From Jack Kerouac to Easy Rider, road novels and movies made their sets of them, so they settled in our minds as obvious elements of our way of life.
The mirrored world of Second Life couldn’t renounce to sprinkle them all around, and this exhibit has the aim to show how fascinating can be this roadside world.
Enjoy it!

Roadside by Melusina Parkin – Impressions (2)

The above text is from a notecard that you can grab at the exhibtion. In the notecard Melusina also writes about her style as a photographer: “Many of my photos tend towards minimalism, that’s my main inclination: catching a simple detail from daily life or usual landscapes, enhancing it, making it protagonist of mostly empty scenes. This reveals its meaning or can push the observer to give it her/his own. Minimalism stresses void, space, geometries: you can be confused by that, but you can also been led to meditate about what things are when they are out of the crowd. Finally, I take and edit some of my photos in a vintage mood. Second Life makes old times live again and it pushes me to enhance my passion for reflections about past and present, absences and losses, nostalgia, love or hate for the past. But the main feature of my works is the lack of human beings: usually, you can’t see people in my pictures, although they are. Since a virtual world is made by its users, not only objects and buildings, but even nature, landscapes, skyes and clouds are made by them; they express people’s bias and souls.

Roadside by Melusina Parkin

I couldn’t describe Melusina Parkin’s pictures any better than she did herself. Looking at them is intriguing and like Inara wrote in her post, you begin to make up your own story when you dive into the pictures. You can also see Melusina’s focus on small details. Finally, her pictures did remind me of my many visits to the US and the wides spaces as well as what I saw at the roadside.

I enjoyed my visit. The exhibtion “Roadside” shall stay open at least until End of June 2020.
I finally had a look at Melusina’s store “Melu Deco”. It offers Art Deco furniture, lamps, rugs and home accessories. Many of the items are copies of famous 1920-40s designers’ objects.

Roadside by Melusina Parkin – Impressions (3) / a view into “Melu’s Deco”-stire

There’s a lot more about Melusina Parker and her photographs not only on her flickr page. Melusina has an own blog for her work, there’s an online book with pictures of some of her exhibitions in Second life from 2011 – 2019 and you canwatch some slideshows on Melusina’s youtube channel. Quite impressive! Thank you Melusina.

Landmark to Melusina Photo Gallery
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/248/101/1940
Landmark to Melusina Parkin’s store for Art Deco furniture “Melu Deco”
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Time%20Portal/243/99/1930
Melusina Parker’s Flickr:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/melusina_parkin/
Melusina’s blog:
http://meluphoto.blogspot.it/p/home.html
On line book Second Life exhibits 2011-2019
https://www.calameo.com/books/005997622f28dd58ca75d
Melusina Parkin’s youtube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVzglBiqhrOLXnAp3Qt3Zjw
Inara Pey’s blogpost “Melu’s Roadside images in Second Life”
https://modemworld.me/2020/05/20/melus-roadside-images-in-second-life/

Simploring 2017 (31) The Last Forever – Marfa

I went on a simploring tour Saturday, April 22nd. I decided to visit “The Last Forever“, a landmark that I picked from Nix Bubbles’ blog. The landmark description was not really revealing for me: “The Last Forever is a new sim/full region inspired by Marfa, TX from the creators of West of The Rain, Oobleck Allagash and Nodnol Jameson (KraftWork), along with the creative team of Kai Mannequin, Brooke Barmy, Rooky Yootz, Triin, Misty and Jack Hanby.” I haven’t heard about Marfa in Texas before nor did I came across of any of the mentionened names. Most of “The Last Forever” I understood later, when I looked up some profiles and after reading about Marfa, TX.

April 22nd: The Last Forever – overview

Marfa was founded in the early 1880s as a railroad water stop. The town was named “Marfa” at the suggestion of the wife of a railroad executive. The Marfa Army Airfield served as a training facility for several thousand pilots during World War II. It was closed 1945. Marfa has a population of about 2,000 people, hence it is really small.
Today, Marfa is a tourist destination and a major center for Minimalist art. Attractions include Building 98, the Chinati Foundation, artisan shops, historical architecture, a classic Texas town square, modern art installments, art galleries, and the Marfa lights. The city is also 37 miles (60 km) from Prada Marfa, a pop art exhibit, which might be the most photographed and visited site in Marfa. The area around Marfa is known as a cultural center for contemporary artists and artisans. In 1971, minimalist artist Donald Judd moved to Marfa from New York City. Since Judd’s death in 1994, two foundations have worked to maintain his legacy: the Chinati Foundation and Judd Foundation. Every year the Chinati Foundation holds an open house event where artists, collectors, and enthusiasts come from around the world to visit Marfa’s art.
(Source: wikipedia
The landing point is at the Marker of Marfa, which is based on Marfa in the reality. Upon your landing you get a welcome “Welcome to The Last Forever SIM home of KraftWork, BIGBULLY, Powder Pack, Kiss me Poses and Triin.” KraftWork and BIGBULLY are shops for mesh creations for decorations and furniture in Second Life. Powder Pack is a store for make-up and skins for mesh heads and Kiss me Poses is a store for poses. The Last Forever is the home of these stores. I didn’t find out what Triin is.
Marfa in Second Life looks a bit like I would imagine a little town in Texas. First of all it is in the middle of nowhere and surrounded by a desert. There are some modern buildings but also some buildings that have seen better times. And there are some ruins and abandoned homes. The infrastructure is dilapidated and some corners and areas look shabby. What I noticed before I did the above research about Marfa in the real world is the art spreaded all over the sim.
I walked around town and collected some impressions of Marfa in SL. I explored the mainstores of KraftWork and BIGBULLY. I went into the radio station and I couldn’t refrain from peeking into the local sex shop. I visited the exhibit Americana, American Icons in Second Life by Melusina Parkin. Outside of the town is the famous Prada Marfa, a camping ground, and some houses. The atmosphere is dense and The Last Forever looks quite real, in particular when you know about Marfa in reality. Monday, April 24th, just 2 days after my visit, I noticed that Inara Pey published an entry about Melusina Parkin’s Americana exhibit titeled “Melusina’s American Icons in Second life in her blog, just the very same day that I visited Marfa. What a coincdence!
Thank you Oobleck (allagash) and Nodnol Jameson (owner of KraftWork) for providing The Last Forever to the public. You understood how to combine the site of some mainstores (including your own) with the experience of a great place in Second Life and you contributed to my education as I now know about Marfa.
Landmark to The Last Forever
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/The%20Last%20Forever/181/97/23
Inara Pey’s blog entry about Melusina Parkin’s Americana exhibit at The Last Forever
https://modemworld.me/2017/04/21/melusinas-american-icons-in-second-life/