Simploring 2019 (35) Ukivok

On March 24th Serene Footman and Jade Koltai opened their newest sim named Ukivok. And again they take us to a place far away, a place I never heard of before, a place still exsistent but forgotten and abandoned. Ukivok is located on King Island, an island in the Bering Sea, around 64 km off the Alaskan coast, a rocky island that it just 2,5km long and 2,2km wide. It was once home for about 200 Inupiat, who lived there during the Winter months particularly for hunting and fishing on the ice. Since 1970 Ukivok is abandoned, but the stilt houses of the village are still there.

Impressions of Ukivok (1) – overview and landing point

Before you visit Ukivok, I strongly recommend that you visit Serene and Jade’s website and read the blog post about Ukivok: “Ukivok, and the People of the Sea“. Serene has collected a lot of information about Ukivok and the Inupiat, pictures of Ukivok and videos and some background information regarding how the Inupiat lived there, about their traditions as well as about why Ukivok was abandoned finally.

Impressions of Ukivok (2) – at the landing point

Ukivok in Second Life gave me an impression of the village in reality. There once were 2 larger buildings, a school and a church. The school does still exsist while the church has fallen apart. In SL you’ll find both buildings. High above the village there’s a statue of Christ the King, the Inupiat (they call themselves Aseuluk) were Catholics and this statue is also there in reality.

Impressions of Ukivok (3) – exploring the village / old school house (lower right)

In Ukivok in Second Life you’ll can also see an “Alaskan Stonehedge”, a completely natural group of single rocks and this is once again a feature of the real King Island. Last but not least the Inupiat had a ropeway to transport goods from or to the sea level. In Second life this ropeway is a bit longer, actually it is a zipline and added just for fun.

Impressions of Ukivok (4) – exploring the village / old church (lower right)

Walking through Ukivak is a challenge even in Second Life, but exploring in the virtual world is safe, you won’t get hurt, even when you fall. You have to look out how to get from one level of the village to the next, there are stairs and ladders. The small podests in from of half brocken houses offer a lot of opportunities to sit and enjoy, to listen to the sound of the many birds, which are the main inhabitants of Ukivok nowadays, or to simply inhale the particular atmosphere of this place.

Impressions of Ukivok (5) – statue of Christ the King, “Alaskan Stonehedge”, at the zipline

Impressions of Ukivok (6) – Diomita having fun sliding down the zipline / more impressions

I mainly used my personal standard windlight setting (Annan Adored Realistic Ambient) but I doesn’t reflect the uniqueness of Ukivok, the cold and the loneliness, well enough. I played a bit with other settings and added a few of these experimental pictures.

Ukivok – playing with the windlight settings

The blogpost about Ukivok is very instructive and being able to visit the village right after reading is an experience that you can only have in a virtual world like Second Life. Thank you Serene and Jade, you really make use of the possibilities of SL. Very impressive once again!

Landmark to Ukivok
https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Dulcis/227/118/22
Blogpost with all information about Ukivok
https://furillen.org/2019/03/24/ukivok-and-the-people-of-the-sea/
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/ukivok/

Simploring 2019 (17) Chesapeake Bay

Forget me not, is all I ask.” is inscripted on the grave slab of Effie L. Wilson, who was born Jan. 16th, 1880 and died Oct. 12th, 1893 on Holland Island which is located the Cheseapeake Bay. She just became 13 years old. Holland Island itself is mostly sunken, just some sandbanks are left and might vanish soon as well as hundreds of other islands did in the Chesapeake Bay.

Stephen White, a waterman and Methodist Minster, fought more than 15 years trying to save Holland island and the last house remaining of once 60 houses which were inhabitated by more than 400 people in the 19th century. He lost this fight. The last house sunk in 2010. But he did succeed in one thing: Effie L. Wilson isn’t forgotten.

Holland Island in the Chesapeake Bay – real and virtual

This and other stories around the many sunken islands inspired Serene Footman and Jade Koltai to re-erect not only Holland Island in the state shortly before the last house was swallowed by the sea.
Serene and Jade also added a lighthouse from Sharps Island which still peeks out of the water while Sharps Island itself sank in 1960, somewhat earlier than Holland Island. And they added a popular hotel that was built on the island and sank with it.

Sharps Island in the Chesapeake Bay – real and virtual

Serene Footman published a very interesting and instructive article about the sunken islands in the Chesapeake Bay and the stories behind his’ and Jade’s newest installation “Chesapeake Bay” (read “The Islands that Disappeared” on Serene’s website furillen.org). There’re many pictures of today and from the past alongside some videos for example about Stephen White and his futile fight to save the last house of Holland Island.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (1)

I strongly recommend to read and watch the Videos first before you visit “Chesapeake Bay” in Second Life. Knowing the background and some of the stories, the many lifes lived on these sunken islands lets you feel the magic of this place in the virtual world of Second Life.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (2)

Of course there’s more to explore and discover at Chesapeake Bay. Besides the historical buildings and structures there’re plenty of places to sit, mediate, chat or just enjoy the environment and the rich wildlife. Colonies of birds are living on what’s left of the Islands.

Impressions of Chesapeake Bay in Second Life (3)

For me it was particular to visit Chesapeake Bay in Second Life, as I was in the area in the 1990ies and in the 2010ies – not aware of all of this. Serene and Jade’s transformations of particular places in the physical world into the virtual world of Second Life truely enrich my expierence. Thank you Serene and Jade!

Landmark to Chesapeake Bay
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Epsilon/191/179/21
Information and background provided by Serene Footman “The Islands that Disappeared”
https://furillen.org/2019/02/09/the-islands-that-disappeared/
Serene Footman’s website
http://www.furillen.org/

Simploring 2019 (7) Rummu

When I saw a post on scoop.it SL Destinations reporting that Serene Footman and Jade Koltai had just opened a new sim called Rummu I had to read about it and of course I had to visit it. Serene has written a very detailed documentation about Rummu, Estonia, the place they rebuilt in SL. I strongly recommend to read this documentation and to watch the documantaries embedded there. It provides the needed information to judge what you see in Second Life. It also makes your visit in Second Life getting closer to the feeling that you know this place as if you were there.

Impression of Rummu quarry, Estonia (1)

So what is Rummu? First of all it is a small borough in northern Estonia. Secondly there’s the Rummu quarry, a submerged limestone and Vasalemma marble quarry.
The latter is a specific kind of limestone with its structure and texture resembling that of marble. The quarry is close to two former prisons, the nearest being the former Rummu prison. During the Soviet era, until the 1990s, excavation was performed as hard labour prisoners. When pumping of water ceased, the quarry quickly filled with groundwater, forming a lake, immersing some of the utility buildings and machinery. Next to the lake is the Vasalemma spoil tip (slag heap). Over time, the spoil tip assumed a unique appearance through erosion by water.
With the closure of the Rummu quarry, the area became a featured location for nature photography, hiking, rafting, scuba diving, as a summer spot, musical and sports events, and as a filming location for its unique layout. The site was depicted in the post-apocalyptic short film The Most Beautiful Day (2015) by Einar Kuusk. Several of the deserted buildings at Rummu were featured in the video for hit song “Faded” (2015) by Norwegian DJ Alan Walker.
Jump-diving into the lake off derelict buildings is very dangerous, because the lake bed contains pieces of thick concrete, tree branches, rebar spikes, metal construction (including machinery), and plenty of barbed wire.“(excerpt from wikipedia)
The area is closed now officially, which doesn’t prevent people from visiting.

Impression of Rummu quarry, Estonia (2)

Serene writes about Rummu:
Those who visit Rummu and write about the experience invariably say that besides the strange beauty of the derelict buildings that lie partially submerged, it is the knowledge of what lies below the water – and the terrible history of the prison itself – that lends the place its extraordinary charisma. We have tried to recreate this combination of surface and depth. If you venture into the water and walk around, you will soon find yourself in darkness, surrounded by plants and pieces of derelict building. Keep on going down the slope, and in the depths you will reach some gates. Here you enter the prison itself, deep under the water, just as divers do today. It’s a creepy place, for sure.

Above ground, Rummu’s most striking feature consists of the giant slag heaps that were created by quarry works. These act as a great vantage point, while in the real place, they have to be crossed to gain access to the beach. Besides the ruined buildings and underwater prison, Rummu’s other distinctive feature are its murals, and we have recreated some of these – while adding others – at the sim. The biggest murals, most notably the image of the coffee cup, which exists at Rummu, appear to be the work of a Moscow-based group of artists called Zukclub.” (taken from Serene’s website)

Rummu in Second Life – overview

Enough foreword and quotes – let’s get to Rummu in SL.
Rummu is a moderate homestead. It is dominated by the lake with the rests of the prison and the quarry underwater, some concrete ruins of the former buildings still reaching high out of the water. There’s the slag heap, two big hills right next to the lake. Plants are growing on the slag heap. The lake is surrounded by beaches and some other solitaire concrete hugs buildings. The nature has taken back almost everything, plants and trees are growing out of every crack of the ruins. Some of the walls are covered artfully with murals outside and inside of the buildings.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (1)

You can walk inside of the buildings and climb up to the roos for the view and for the fun there’s a zip lane leading from one of the buildings to a ruin in the center of the lake. Serene has added reams of chairs, benches, loungers, beach furntiure, camping furniture and during my visit some of them were taken by other visitors. You can also use a Swan paddle boat, the one I saw when visiting :notos:deer: (read Simploring 2018 (106) :nostos:deer:).

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (2)

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (3)

I explored the whole sim, I visited the hut as well as the two cranes behind the slag heap. I dived and looked at the sunken prison, I went into all buildings, and i visited the ruins of a huge indoor swimming hall. I think, I won’t forget the statue there “A woman is more dangerous than a loaded pistol”, although I have no idea if it is something that belongs to the real Rummu (I think it doesn’t) nor do I know if it is build after a statue in RL.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (4)

Rummu for sure has it’s magic attraction. Having the pictures in mind that I saw in the documentaries on Serene’s website made my visit quite real. It’s great to see how people take over these really scary places and turn it into something to enjoy. That doesn’t make us forget the history but gives hope that terror and violence won’t ever be permanent.

Impressions of Rummu in Second Life (5)

Thank you Serene Footman and Jade Koltai for providing this once again impressive place to the public. I did really enjoy my visit!

Landmark to Rummu
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Gainesville/142/169/22
Serene Footman’s website page about Rummu
https://furillen.org/2019/01/01/welcome-to-rummu/
Wikipedia entry about Rummu quarry
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rummu_quarry
Flickr group
https://www.flickr.com/groups/rummusl/

Simploring 2018 (89) Black Bayou Lake

When I saw the first reviews of Black Bayou Lake on scoop.it SL Destinations I knew I had to see this sim. It is the newest creation of Serene Footman and his partner Jade Koltai. Serene Footman is the creator of places like Furillen, Dunkirk – La Digue du Braek, Khodovarikha and Isle of May, all of which I visited and wrote about (read here: Furillen, Dunkirk – La Digue du Braek, Khodovarikha, Isle of May). All these sims have one thing in common: they are built according to a place in the physical world – and so is Black Bayou Lake.

Impressions of Black Bayou Lake in Second Life (1)

On Serene Footman’s website you find a detailed description about Black Bayou Lake:
Black Bayou Lake (link to wikipedia) – the inspiration for our sim – is located in Ouachita Parish, Louisiana. The lake is part of an 800 acre nature reserve – there is a factsheet about it here – which seethes with wildlife: there are many species of bird, insect, reptile and fish, along with a variety of trees such as cherrybark oak, cedar elm, ash, hickories, willow oak, shortleaf pine, loblolly pine, mockernut hickory and post oak. It’s a stunning place, which attracted us because we had not yet tried designing a sim that consists mainly of water…...”

Black Bayou Lake in Second Life is a virtual interpretation of the nature reserve in the physcial world. The most outstanding feature both places have in common is a long wooden footpath that visitors can use to explore and to even walk out onto the lake. The swamp with it’s unique flora and the bare trees is another feature they share. Even some of the huts that are scattered on the sim look similar to those found in the nature reserve.

Impressions of Black Bayou Lake in Second Life (2)

I didn’t change the windlight setting that was provided. The atmosphere is very foggy and mystic, you can almost sense the humidity. I walked along the whole footpath, enjoyed the views, sat down here and there, listened to the birds singing (don’t forget to turn on the ambient sound!) and took a lot of pictures.
When I left the wooden footpath, I fall into the swamp several times. Luckily that’s not dangerous in Second Life, nonetheless you’d better watch your step.

Impressions of Black Bayou Lake in Second Life (3)

Visiting Black Bayou Lake was a great experience that I really enjoyed. I looked up a lot of information about the Black Bayou Lake National Wildlife Refuge. It did not replace a visit to it in real life, but together with some pictures of the real place it felt as if I were there. I assume just the smell and the damp heat is what I missed *winks*.

Thank you Serene Footman and Jade Koltai for sharing your creation with the public!

Landmark for Black Bayou Lake
https://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Gainesville/144/204/21
Serene Footman’s website
https://furillen.org/black-bayou-lake/
Black Bayou Lake on Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Bayou_Lake_National_Wildlife_Refuge
Description from a visit at Black Bayou Lake
https://flatfooting.wordpress.com/2014/10/01/black-bayou-lake-national-wildlife-refuge/
Black Bayou Lake Factsheet
https://www.fws.gov/southeast/pdf/fact-sheet/black-bayou-lake-national-wildlife-refuge.pdf

Simploring 2018 (30) – Isle of May

scoop.it SL Destinations has become my favourite source for picking destinations for my simploring tour. Sunday, March 25th, I came across “Isle of May“, a new sim created by Serene Footman.
I was excited seeing a new sim of Serene. Serene’s sims are facinating and bring you to destinations you might never see in the physical world but you can visit them in this virtual environment and you also begin to make some research about these places. Hence it is like a real short vacation. The last place of Serene Footman was Khodovarika and I also saw Dunkirk – La Digue du Braek and Furillen.
This said, you know why I was excited to see “Isle of May“.

The Isle of May (source: wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_May)

The Isle of May is located in the north of the outer Firth of Forth, approximately 8 km (5.0 mi) off the coast of mainland Scotland. It is 1.8 kilometres (1.1 miles) long and less than half a kilometre wide. Itwas designated a National Nature Reserve on 12 June 1956 and is managed by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH). Although only around 57 hectares in size, over 285 bird species have been recorded on the island. At the height of the breeding season, the Isle of May can host around 200,000 seabirds, including puffins, kittiwake, guillemots, razorbills, shags and fulmars. These numbers can fluctuate considerably from year to year, depending on weather and fish stocks.
As well as its natural heritage, the Isle of May also has a rich cultural heritage, including St Adrian’s Chapel, the Isle of May Lighthouse and others.
Most visitors to the island are daytrippers taking the ferry from Anstruther in Fife, although up to six visitors can stay at the bird observatory, usually for a week at a time. The only way to get there is by ferry; the journey takes 45 minutes from the small ports of Anstruther and Crail, and also from North Berwick.
The island is closed to visitors from 1 October until Easter to prevent disturbance to the large number of seal pups. The Scottish Seabird Centre at North Berwick has two live cameras on the island, which can be remotely controlled by visitors, to allow close viewing of the seabird cities, including puffins, guillemots, razorbills, shags, cormorants and terns and the fluffy grey seal pups in winter, without disturbance. The Scottish Seabird Centre also runs boat trips to the Isle of May (from wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isle_of_May).

Isle of May in Second Life – overview

Isle of May in Second Life – around the landing point

While the real Isle of May has no permanent residents, Serene’s island is home to a small group of artists, a lighthouse keeper and a ranger who takes care of the island’s birds and wildlife. The sim is on two levels, with a beautiful, peaceful U-shaped cliff top area covered in vegetation and lower beaches on either side. The buildings on the sim are few: the main house stands at the centre of the sim, with a lighthouse and foghorn station to one side and the wildlife keeper’s office together with the ruins of St Adrian’s Chapel on the other.

Impressions of Isle of May in Second Life (1)

Down below, on small beaches, there are various buildings such as an old stone house, beach huts and a fisherman’s lodge. All around the island there is a wild sea crashing against rocks and cliffs (excerpt from Serene’s homepage).

Impressions of Isle of May in Second Life (2)

In Second Life the Isle of May offers a lot of places to sit and watch, to listen to she sounds of birds and nature and to look at the wild sea crashing against the rocks. The main house in the center of the island, right next to the landing, is worth to visit also from the inside. There’re several ateliers for artists and the views through the windows are great.

Impressions of Isle of May in Second Life (3)

I also liked the fisherman’s lodge, that snuggles against the rock in a quite wind protected niche – I got 99 problems and fishing solves all of them. Isle of May is for enjoying the nature and finding some peace, a short vacation just like I expected it.

At Serene Footman’s Homepage I found this video about “Isle of May in Second Life” taken by Serendipity Dyrssen.

The Isle of May in Second Life was created by Serene Footman and Jade Koltai. A big thank you to both of you!

Landmark to Isle of May
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Weed/100/102/41
Serene Footman’s homepage
https://furillen.org/
Serendipity Dyrssen’s viedo about Isle of May in Second Life
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=6sLEM8rru9k

Simploring 2017 (80) Khodovarikha

Last year I visited two sims created by Serene Footman, Dunkirk – La Digue du Braek and Furillen in Second Life. Both sims showed a virtual copy of real places in the physcial world and places that are not really famous or well known. Unfortunately bot sims are closed now.

On Thursday, October 5th, I had some time for a simploring tour and as there wasn’t any entry in one of the blogs that I follow, that caught my interest I looked up the SL Desination guide. This way I came across Khodovarikha, which is “a weather station located on the freezing Barents Sea. Remote and desolate, with a permanent population of just one man, Slava. Witness his ‘arctic limbo’ in one of the loneliest places on earth.” It turned out that this is a sim created by Serene Footman. And it is a virtual copy of a real place in the physcial world again too and again, I never heard anything about it before.

Khodovarikha, Russia in the phycial world. Sources wikipedia and http://www.furillen.org

And there’s also not that much on wikipedia about it.
Khodovarikha is a point in the coast of the Pechora Sea located on a landspit projecting eastwards over the bay. It belongs to the Nenets Autonomous Okrug administrative region, which is an autonomous okrug of Arkhangelsk Oblast.
There is a lighthouse at Khodovarikha that used to be an important beacon for the Russian convoy route coming from the Yugorsky Strait in World War II. It was shelled in 1942 by the Kriegsmarine during Operation Wunderland. The lighthouse ceased operation in 1996. There was a small populated place close by that has been abandoned. However, there is still a functioning weather station in Khodovarikha.”

October 5th: Impressions Khodovarikha in Second Life (1)

Serene Footman’s Website, which I visited last year to find out more about La Digue du Braek and about Furillen, does still exist and there’s a separate site about Khodovarikha in the physcial world. I strongly recommend that you read that before you visit Khodovarikha in Second Life (I did afterwards unfortunately). Some of the buildings in Second Life and the whole set up make so much more sense, when you know about the background, about how it looks there and about Slava, who lives there. Here is the direct link to the page about Khodovarikha.

October 5th: Impressions Khodovarikha in Second Life (2)

On the furillen website I also found an entry “Breaking Ice: a 70 Year Story – by Tizzy Canucci“. Tizzy Canucci has made a movie that combines – literally, with a split screen – Second Life footage taken at the sim with an archive film, ‘The Great Northern Sea Route’, that was made in the USSR in 1947. The juxtaposition of real and virtual that Tizzy achieves here is absolutely fascinating. The video is about 10 minutes long and worth watching as an attunement before visiting Khodovarikha in Second Life.

October 5th at Khodovarikha in Second Life – a bizarre picture: Diomita in fetish clothes outside in the snowy cold with an aurora borealis in the background

Thank you Serene Footman for this very interesting sim and the background you provided. It was a pleasure to learn about Khodovarikha and to visit it.

Landmark to Khodovarikha
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Porter%20Islands/79/181/22
Website about Furillen and Khodovarikha
http://www.furillen.org/

Dunkirk – La Digue du Braek

20161209-la-digue-du-break_001Once again I went simploring. A post in Inara’s blog caught my attention: “Walking La Digue du Braek in Second Life“. Industrial structures, cranes, rust, dirt, and black smoke are rare in Second Life. La Digue du Braek is the creation of Serene Footmann and his partner Jade Koltai. Serene Footman is alse the creation of Furillen which I visited in November (Furillen in Second Life). Like Furillen, La Digue du Braek is the Second Life version of a real place – it’s a long street at the harbour of Dunkirk, France. On one side of this road is a beach and just opposed to it is the harbour. You’ll find more Information about La Digue du Braek at the Furillen homepage.

La Digue du Break, Dunkirk, France (snapshot from https://furillen.org/la-digue-du-braek/)

La Digue du Braek, Dunkirk, France (snapshot from https://furillen.org/la-digue-du-braek/)

The contrasts at La Digue du Braek are really impressive. Beach, nature and the industrial harbour are just next to eachother. The Harbour suprises with two sided open containers, which are furnished as if someone is living there. Then there is a tower buildt of piled-up mobile homes. At the top of this tower you can seemingly touch the tall cranes. And there’s a big warehouse with oddities from all over the world. For example i saw a Christmas pyramid there. I can also recommend to just sit at the beach and inhale the atmosphere of La Digue du Braek.20161209-la-digue-du-break_01820161209-la-digue-du-break_019La Digue du Braek is a very different sim proving once again the variety of Second Life. It feels real at the first glance. Once you go exploring more in detail you can see more contrasts: the container ship with the dark smoke (hence in operation) and the car wrecks in the harbour, the containers with two open sides but used for living, the piled up mobile homes that look abandoned inside, the huge warehouse which is empty inside except some oddities. The contrasts make La Digue du Braek so different form the real spot, a form of art that is possible in Second Life.20161209-la-digue-du-break_020Landmark to La Digue du Braek
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Muppets%20Island/111/232/23
Inara Pey’s blog “Walking La Digue du Braek in Second Life”
https://modemworld.me/2016/12/04/walking-la-digue-du-braek-in-second-life/
Furillen homepage
https://furillen.org/la-digue-du-braek/

Furillen in Second Life

Saturday, November 5th, I looked up the SL destination guide and came across Furillen. Somehow the name rang a bell, but more about this later. The description read very tempting for me “Furillen depicts an island off the north-east coast of Sweden containing abandoned industrial builds that were once part of a former limestone factory. Remote, bleak and beautiful, this is a Second Life photographers haven.”

Once I arrived at Furillen and saw the cold, snowy, dismal island with the ruins of a former insudstry, I began to do some research about Furillen.20161105-furillen_017Furillen (older spelling Furilden) is an island in Rute on the northeast coast of Gotland, Sweden. For most of the 20th century, there was a limestone industry on the island until it was closed to the public by the Swedish military in the 1970s–90s, when radar installations became operational. The north part of Furillen is a nature reserve and a Natura 2000 area. Since 2000, the old factory buildings from the limestone industry have been used as hotel and conference venues by the Fabriken Furillen (the Furillen Factory) company, owned by photographer and entrepreneur Jonas Hellström. He started out using the abandoned factory and its surroundings as a backdrop for commercials and rock videos. (source Wikipedia)

November 5th - Furillen in Second Life: Arrving at Furillen

November 5th – Furillen in Second Life: Arrving at Furillen

There’s a website about this sim furillen.org and I recommend visiting it first. The following information is en excerpt taken from furillen.org. The sim is owned and was created by serene footman in Ocotber 2015. Serene is an university professor in the UK in RL and the author of several books. “I originally ventured into Second Life as a researcher. I have always found creative sims to be the most compelling aspect of Second Life. By creating Furillen, I wanted to provide an environment in which photographers and Second Life wanderers would feel welcomed and inspired.”
The virtual Furillen was designed to retain some of the most distinct and recognisable features of the real Furillen: the airstream, the tree line and pier, for example, together with the large slag heaps that still exist as a reminder of the old quarry. In addition, there are several buildings, the main being a hotel that – on the virtual Furillen – doubles up as an art space with a series of rooms featuring minimalist installations.20161105-furillen_018
Furillen became quite a social space. It is, especially, a place for photographers. Serene has also staged events over the past year, most memorably those devoted to Bowie, Radiohead and Pink Floyd – and it is the Pink Floyd event that rang a bell for me. I’ve visited Furillen before together with Mistress jenny during this event, not konowing about the background of Furillen. You can read in this blog about the Pink Floyd event in the article “Pink“.
It is amazing how perfectly Serene succeeded in making the virtual Furillen looking similar to the real island as you can see when you compare the pictures from wikipedia with the pictures taken in Second Life – chapeau! One of the old buildings is used for exhibitions and right now there’s an exhibition called “Birds” with photographs from laura.20161105-furillen_019

I roamed over the island and climbed on the structures and was impressed how intense you feel to be in a real abandoned industry ruin. The highlight of my visit was the hotel which is placed just behind the tree line. The tree line looks really misplaced on this island in this dismal environment but is also just reflecting the real Furillen. In the hotel each room is a different piece of art, mostly surreal and a heaven for photograhers.

November 5th - Furillen in Second Life: The hotel behind the tree line

November 5th – Furillen in Second Life: The hotel behind the tree line

2s1611s5-furillen_020

I know I am by far not the first writing about Furillen. There’s a long list of articles on furillen.org. Nonetheless I wanted to keep something for this diary and to inspire others to have a look at Furillen. Thank you so much Serene for providing this sim to the public!
Landmark to Furillen in Second Life
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Love%20of%20Life/160/105/21
Website Furillen
https://furillen.org/
List of articles about Furillen in Second Life
https://furillen.org/reviews/

Pink

The title of this post is a bit misleading intentionally. This post is about Pink Floyd – Pink Floyd in Second Life to be more precisely. Again I came across it following Inara Pey’s blog. Her post is titeled “When Pink Floyd eats your sim in Second Life“. This place is temporarily a real homage to Pink Floyd, their music and their art. Serene Footman, who owns the sim “Furillen“, wrote a full decription of what you can see here and titeled it “Pink Floyd ate my sim“.

July 11th: Furillen - Pink Floyd (1)

July 11th: Furillen – Pink Floyd (1)

One of the attractions is Battersea Power Station which is famous as it it appeared on the cover of Pink Floyd’s 1977 album Animals, on which it was photographed with the group’s inflatable pink pig floating above it. Inside of the building I felt beamed back into the 1970ies. The huge giant hall is filled with fog steadily changing in all colours of the rainbow. There’s a seating goup in one corner, a big picture of Battersea Power Station and a “Fower Power” Volkswagen Transporter.

July 11th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita inside Battersea Power Station at Furillen

July 11th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita inside Battersea Power Station at Furillen

But there’s a lot more to discover, way too much to list it here. I recommend reading the above mentioned post in the Furillen blog (“Pink Floyd ate my sim“). In the Furillen blog you will also find a full list of all objects from Pink Floyd that you can discover here on one spot in 3D. And there’re lots of really great pictures, just have a look into the blog “Furillen – love of (a minimalist) life“.

July 11th: Furillen - Pink Floyd (2)

July 11th: Furillen – Pink Floyd (2)

Of course the music stram provided is Pink Floyd. Actually I read that it is a 13 hour play list featuring every studio album made by Pink Floyd, in chronological order. While we were visiting we heard “Shine On You Crazy Diamond” (1975) and we, Mistress Jenny and me, just stood there enjoying the music. And even slave cecy, who accompanied us, just knelt silently and relaxed. By the way, the slideshow at the wall in the pictures above and below is one of 2 slideshows that contain around 800 (!) pictures.

July 11th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita at Furillen enjoying Pink Floyd

July 11th: Mistress Jenny and Diomita at Furillen enjoying Pink Floyd

Art in SL is temporary. We can keep it in pictures and in our memories but it is digital and mostly short-lived. The Pink Floyd installation might be gone soon again.
Really fitting to our visit to Furillen was a strange avatar that we just saw shortly. I managed to take a picture. He could have appeared on a Pink Floyd cover in my humble opinion.

July 11th: The "grid-man" at Furillen - Pink Floyd

July 11th: The “grid-man” at Furillen – Pink Floyd (in the background the beds based on the cover of A Momentary Lapse of Reason)

Landmark Furillen:
http://maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Love%20of%20Life/166/96/21
Blog Furillen – love of (a minimalist) life:
https://furillen.org/
Blog Pink Floyd ate my sim:
https://furillen.org/2016/07/09/pink-floyd-ate-my-sim/
Inara Pey’s blog When Pink Floyd eats your sim in Second Life:
https://modemworld.me/2016/07/11/when-pink-floyd-eats-your-sim-in-second-life/

 

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